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Family labor supply, commuting time, and residential decisions: The case of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area

  • Abe, Yukiko

In this paper, I build a model of family labor supply and residential choices that explicitly incorporates the full-time or part-time work decisions of married women. The model can explain why women's participation patterns in full-time and part-time work vary significantly in areas that are geographically close but differ in real estate prices. The model suggests that high commuting costs could be one of the main obstacles for women's full-time employment in places like the Tokyo Metropolitan Area.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Housing Economics.

Volume (Year): 20 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 49-63

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:20:y:2011:i:1:p:49-63
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  1. Rappaport, Jordan & Kahn, Matthew E. & Glaeser, Edward, 2008. "Why Do The Poor Live In Cities? The Role of Public Transportation," Scholarly Articles 2958224, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Gaston, Noel & Kishi, Tomoko, 2007. "Part-time workers doing full-time work in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 435-454, December.
  3. Fujita,Masahisa, 1991. "Urban Economic Theory," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521396455, October.
  4. Fortin, N.M., 1992. "Allocation Inflexibilities , Female Labor Supply and Housing Assets Accumulation: Are Women Working to Pay the Mortagage," Cahiers de recherche 9204, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
  5. Yukiko Abe, 2009. "The Effects Of The 1.03 Million Yen Ceiling In A Dynamic Labor Supply Model," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(2), pages 147-163, 04.
  6. Shinichiro Iwata & Keiko Tamada, 2008. "The Backward-bending Commute times of Married Women with Household Responsibility," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-582, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  7. Del Boca, Daniela & Lusardi, Annamaria, 2002. "Credit Market Constraints and Labor Market Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 598, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Andersson, Fredrik & Burgess, Simon & Lane, Julia, 2004. "Cities, Matching and the Productivity Gains of Agglomeration," CEPR Discussion Papers 4598, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Wheeler, Christopher H, 2001. "Search, Sorting, and Urban Agglomeration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(4), pages 879-99, October.
  10. Paul J. Devereux, 2004. "Changes in Relative Wages and Family Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
  11. Susan N. Houseman & Machiko Osawa, 1998. "What is the Nature of Part-Time Work in the United States and Japan," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: Jacqueline O'Reilly & Colette Fagan (ed.), Part-Time Prospects: An International Comparison of Part-Time Work in Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim, pages 232-251 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  12. LeRoy, Stephen F. & Sonstelie, Jon, 1983. "Paradise lost and regained: Transportation innovation, income, and residential location," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 67-89, January.
  13. Yukiko Abe, 2003. "Fringe Benefit Provision for Female Part-Time Workers in Japan," NBER Chapters, in: Labor Markets and Firm Benefit Policies in Japan and the United States, pages 339-370 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Nawata, Kazumitsu & Ii, Masako, 2004. "Estimation of the labor participation and wage equation model of Japanese married women by the simultaneous maximum likelihood method," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 301-315, September.
  15. Masaru Sasaki, 2002. "The Causal Effect of Family Structure on Labor Force Participation among Japanese Married Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(2), pages 429-440.
  16. Beckmann, Martin J., 1973. "Equilibrium models of residential land use," Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 361-368, November.
  17. Hideo Akabayashi, 2006. "The labor supply of married women and spousal tax deductions in Japan—a structural estimation," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 349-378, December.
  18. Janice Compton & Robert A. Pollak, 2007. "Why Are Power Couples Increasingly Concentrated in Large Metropolitan Areas?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 475-512.
  19. Susan N. Houseman & Machiko Osawa, 2003. "The Growth of Nonstandard Employment in Japan and the United States: A Comparison of Causes and Consequences," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: Timothy J. Bartik & Susan N. Houseman (ed.), Nonstandard Work in Developed Economies: Causes and Consequences, chapter 6, pages 175-214 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  20. Yoshikawa, Hiroshi & Ohtaka, Fumio, 1989. "An analysis of female labor supply, housing demand and the saving rate in Japan," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 997-1023, May.
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