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Forced Migration and the Spread of Infectious Diseases

Author

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  • Ibáñez, Ana María
  • Rozo, Sandra V.
  • Urbina, María J.

Abstract

We examine the role of Venezuelan forced migration on the propagation of 15 infectious diseases in Colombia. For this purpose, we use rich municipal-monthly panel data. We exploit the fact that municipalities closer to the main migration entry points have a disproportionate exposure to infected migrants when the cumulative migration flows increase. We find that higher refugee inflows are associated with increments in the incidence of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as chickenpox and tuberculosis, as well as sexually transmitted diseases, namely syphilis. However, we find no significant effects of migration on the propagation of vector-borne diseases. Contact with infected migrants upon arrival seems to be the main driving mechanism.

Suggested Citation

  • Ibáñez, Ana María & Rozo, Sandra V. & Urbina, María J., 2021. "Forced Migration and the Spread of Infectious Diseases," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:79:y:2021:i:c:s016762962100076x
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2021.102491
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    Cited by:

    1. Cansu Oymak & Jean-François Maystadt, 2023. "Can refugees improve native children’s health?: Evidence from Turkey," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2023017, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    2. Uchenna, Efobi & Joseph, Ajefu, 2024. "Exploring the Spillover Effects of Internally Displaced Settlements on the Wellbeing of Children of the Locales," GLO Discussion Paper Series 1381, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Chatruc,Marisol Rodriguez & Rozo Villarraga,Sandra Viviana, 2022. "Discrimination Toward Migrants During Crises," Policy Research Working Paper Series 10091, The World Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Forced Migration; Infectious Diseases; Health Outcomes;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development

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