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Kingpin approaches to fighting crime and community violence: Evidence from Mexico's drug war

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  • Lindo, Jason M.
  • Padilla-Romo, María

Abstract

This study considers the effects of the kingpin strategy, an approach to fighting organized crime in which law-enforcement efforts focus on capturing the leaders of criminal organizations, on community violence in the context of Mexico's drug war. Newly constructed historical data on drug-trafficking organizations’ areas of operation at the municipality level and monthly homicide data allow us to control for a rich set of fixed effects and to leverage variation in the timing of kingpin captures to estimate their effects. This analysis indicates that kingpin captures cause large and sustained increases to the homicide rate in the municipality of capture and smaller but significant effects on other municipalities where the kingpin's organization has a presence, supporting the notion that removing kingpins can have destabilizing effects throughout an organization that are accompanied by escalations in violence. We also find reductions in homicides in municipalities surrounding the municipality where kingpins are captured.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindo, Jason M. & Padilla-Romo, María, 2018. "Kingpin approaches to fighting crime and community violence: Evidence from Mexico's drug war," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 253-268.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:58:y:2018:i:c:p:253-268
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2018.02.002
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    Cited by:

    1. Battiston, Giacomo & Daniele, Gianmarco & Le moglie, Marco & Pinotti, Paolo, 2022. "Fueling Organized Crime: The Mexican War on Drugs and Oil Thefts," CEPR Discussion Papers 16914, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Hale Utar, 2018. "Firms and Labor in Times of Violence: Evidence from the Mexican Drug War," CESifo Working Paper Series 7345, CESifo.
    3. Golz, Michael & D'Amico, Daniel J., 2018. "Market concentration in the international drug trade," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 28-42.
    4. Balmori de la Miyar, Jose Roberto & Hoehn-Velasco, Lauren & Silverio-Murillo, Adan, 2021. "Druglords don’t stay at home: COVID-19 pandemic and crime patterns in Mexico City," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    5. Hoshino, Tetsuya & Kamada, Takuma, 2020. "Enforcement against Organized Crime Fosters Illegal Markets: Evidence from the Yakuza," SocArXiv r4cmb, Center for Open Science.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Violence; Crime; Kingpin; Mexico; Drugs; Cartels;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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