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Price relations between export and domestic rice markets in Thailand

  • John, Adam

Many rice importing countries argue that rice exporting nations isolate their domestic markets through the use of stabilization pricing policies which cause international rice markets to become excessively volatile. For the argument to hold any weight, price transmission between exporting countries’ domestic and export markets should be unidirectional whereby export prices are driven by domestic prices but domestic prices are not affected by export prices. The study tests the hypothesis on Thailand, traditionally the world’s largest rice exporter. The results from the causality tests are not entirely clear, however the results from the impulse response functions show that while the shocks originating in the domestic market are higher in magnitude in the export market in the short-run, the shocks originating in the export market are more persistent in the domestic market. This suggests that although Thailand’s domestic policies are somewhat effective in the immediate months after the shock they allow price transmission from its export market to transfer over to its domestic market in the long-run. The results therefore imply that Thailand’s domestic pricing programs are not heavily distorting world rice markets.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 42 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 48-57

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:42:y:2013:i:c:p:48-57
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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