IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fao/wpaper/0803.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Have Recent Increases in International Cereal Prices Been Transmitted to Domestic Economies? The experience in seven large Asian countries

Author

Listed:
  • David Dawe

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

Abstract

International cereal prices (in US dollar terms) have been increasing since 2003, but it is domestic prices that affect food consumption and production. This paper analyzes, for seven large Asian countries, the extent to which domestic prices have increased since 2003 and presents several conclusions. First, the data show that the increases in world cereal prices have been accompanied by a real depreciation of the US dollar. For many countries (but not all), this depreciation has neutralized a substantial proportion of the increase in world prices. Second, domestic commodity specific policies in several of these Asian countries have further stabilized domestic prices relative to the change in world prices. This has been especially true for rice, the main staple food in the region, but it is also true for wheat. On average, through the end of 2007, the increase in real domestic rice prices was about one-third of the increase in real US dollar world market rice prices. Third, for the specific cases analyzed here, producer or farmgate prices have changed by approximately the same percentage as consumer prices. Thus, in these Asian countries, domestic markets seem to be transmitting price changes between farmers and consumers rather efficiently. Fourth, the experience with urea fertilizer prices is more heterogeneous: some countries are following free trade, while others have stabilized prices in nominal terms.

Suggested Citation

  • David Dawe, 2008. "Have Recent Increases in International Cereal Prices Been Transmitted to Domestic Economies? The experience in seven large Asian countries," Working Papers 08-03, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  • Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0803
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/010/ai506e/ai506e00.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Warr, Peter G., 2005. "Food policy and poverty in Indonesia: a general equilibrium analysis," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 49(4), December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sushil Pandey & Timothy Sulser & Mark W Rosegrant & Humnath Bhandari, 2010. "Rice Price Crisis: Causes, Impacts, and Solutions," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 7(2), pages 1-15, December.
    2. Rosegrant, Mark W. & Bhandari, Humnath & Pandey, Sushil & Sulser, Timothy, 2. "Rice Price Crisis: Causes, Impacts, and Solutions," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 7(2).
    3. Jamora, Nelissa & Valera, Harold Glenn & Matriz, Mary Joanne & Molina, Imelda & Mohanty, Samarendu, 2010. "The Role of Exchange Rates and Domestic Policies on Global Rice Food Security," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61681, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. repec:eee:wdevel:v:96:y:2017:i:c:p:216-230 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Maes, Kenneth C. & Hadley, Craig & Tesfaye, Fikru & Shifferaw, Selamawit, 2010. "Food insecurity and mental health: Surprising trends among community health volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the 2008 food crisis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(9), pages 1450-1457, May.
    6. Ferguson, Shon & Gars, Johan, 2016. "Productivity Shocks, International Trade and Import Prices: Evidence from Agriculture," Working Paper Series 1107, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    7. Matthias Kalkuhl & Lukas Kornher & Marta Kozicka & Pierre Boulanger & Maximo Torero, 2013. "Conceptual framework on price volatility and its impact on food and nutrition security in the short term," FOODSECURE Working papers 15, LEI Wageningen UR.
    8. Varela, Gonzalo J. & Taniguchi, Kiyoshi, 2014. "Asymmetric Price Transmission in Indonesia’s Wheat Flour Market," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 394, Asian Development Bank.
    9. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Dewina, Reno, 2012. "Risks and spatial connectivity evidence from food price crisis in rural Indonesia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 383-389.
    10. Bekkers, Eddy & Brockmeier, Martina & Francois, Joseph & Yang, Fan, 2017. "Local Food Prices and International Price Transmission," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 216-230.
    11. Baquedano, Felix G. & Liefert, William M., 2014. "Market integration and price transmission in consumer markets of developing countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 103-114.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asia; price transmission; rice; cereals.;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0803. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gustavo Anríquez). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/faoooit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.