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Enhancing Productivity and Resource Conservation by Eliminating Inefficiency of Thai Rice Farmers: A Zero Inefficiency Stochastic Frontier Approach

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  • Jianxu Liu

    () (Faculty of Economics, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand)

  • Sanzidur Rahman

    () (School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK)

  • Songsak Sriboonchitta

    () (Faculty of Economics, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand)

  • Aree Wiboonpongse

    () (Faculty of Economics, Prince of Songkhla University, Hat Yai 90110, Thailand)

Abstract

The study first identified fully efficient farmers and then estimated technical efficiency of inefficient farmers, identifying their determinants by applying a Zero Inefficiency Stochastic Frontier Model (ZISFM) on a sample of 300 rice farmers from central-northern Thailand. Next, the study developed scenarios of potential production increase and resource conservation if technical inefficiency was eliminated. Results revealed that 13% of the sampled farmers were fully efficient, thereby justifying the use of our approach. The estimated mean technical efficiency was 91%, implying that rice production can be increased by 9%, by reallocating resources. Land and labor were the major productivity drivers. Education significantly improved technical efficiency. Farmers who transplanted seedlings were relatively technically efficient as compared to those who practised manual and/or mechanical direct seeding methods. Elimination of technical inefficiency could increase output by 8.64% per ha, or generate 5.7–6.4 million tons of additional rice output for Thailand each year. Similarly, elimination of technical inefficiency would potentially conserve 19.44% person-days of labor, 11.95% land area, 11.46% material inputs and 8.67% mechanical power services for every ton of rice produced. This translates into conservation of 2.9–3.0 million person-days of labor, 3.7–4.5 thousand km 2 of land, 10.0–14.5 billion baht of material input and 7.6–12.8 billion baht of mechanical power costs to produce current level of rice output in Thailand each year. Policy implications include investment into educating farmers, and improving technical knowledge of seeding technology, to boost rice production and conserve scarce resources in Thailand.

Suggested Citation

  • Jianxu Liu & Sanzidur Rahman & Songsak Sriboonchitta & Aree Wiboonpongse, 2017. "Enhancing Productivity and Resource Conservation by Eliminating Inefficiency of Thai Rice Farmers: A Zero Inefficiency Stochastic Frontier Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(5), pages 1-18, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:5:p:770-:d:97918
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jules Ngango & Seung Gyu Kim, 2019. "Assessment of Technical Efficiency and Its Potential Determinants among Small-Scale Coffee Farmers in Rwanda," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(7), pages 1-12, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    technical efficiency; Zero Inefficiency Stochastic Frontier approach; rice production; Thailand;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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