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Economic development and food production-consumption balance: A growing global challenge

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  • Rask, Kolleen J.
  • Rask, Norman

Abstract

Rising affluence in major developing countries (principally China and India) and increasing diversion of agricultural resources for energy production (USA and Brazil) sharply increase agricultural resource demand. Food consumption and production changes during development are analyzed using resource-based cereal-equivalent measures. Diet upgrades to livestock products require fivefold increases in per capita food resource use, reflecting a consistent pattern which is only marginally affected by land base. Food consumption increases exceed production during early development, leading to imports. Consumption eventually stabilizes at high incomes, but production falls short in land-scarce countries. Pork and poultry consumption increase the most; less efficient beef and dairy production command a majority of agricultural resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Rask, Kolleen J. & Rask, Norman, 2011. "Economic development and food production-consumption balance: A growing global challenge," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 186-196, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:36:y:2011:i:2:p:186-196
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. von Braun, Joachim, 2007. "The world food situation: New driving forces and required actions," Food policy reports 18, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Kolleen Rask & Norman Rask, 2004. "Transition Economies and Globalization: Food System Asymmetries on the Path to Free Markets," Working Papers 0410, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    3. Hossain, Ferdaus & Jensen, Helen H., 2000. "Lithuania's food demand during economic transition," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 23(1), June.
    4. Glendining, M.J. & Dailey, A.G. & Williams, A.G. & Evert, F.K. van & Goulding, K.W.T. & Whitmore, A.P., 2009. "Is it possible to increase the sustainability of arable and ruminant agriculture by reducing inputs?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 99(2-3), pages 117-125, February.
    5. Kolleen Rask & Norman Rask, 2004. "Reaching Turning Points in Economic Transition: Adjustments to Distortions in Resource-based Consumption of Food," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 46(4), pages 542-569, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emiko Fukase & Will Martin, 2016. "Who Will Feed China in the 21st Century? Income Growth and Food Demand and Supply in China," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 3-23, February.
    2. Brian J. Revell, 2015. "One Man's Meat … 2050? Ruminations on Future Meat Demand in the Context of Global Warming," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(3), pages 573-614, September.
    3. Debnath, Deepayan & Thompson, Wyatt & Helmar, Michael & Julian, Binfield, 2014. "Long term consequences of changing global food consumption patterns on U.S. agricultural commodity export demand," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170490, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Bonga-Bonga, Lumengo & Ahiakpor, Ferdinand, 2015. "Determinants of Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: The case of Ghana," MPRA Paper 66923, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Fukase,Emiko & Martin,William J., 2017. "Economic growth, convergence, and world food demand and supply," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8257, The World Bank.
    6. Rosa Duarte & Vicente Pinilla & Ana Serrano, 2015. "Global water in a global world a long term study on agricultural virtual water flows in the world," Documentos de Trabajo dt2015-03, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    7. Karlis Smits & Bingjie Hu & Binglie Luo & Tony Ollero & Ekaterine Vashakmadze & Klaus Rohland & Sudhir Shetty & Bert Hoftman & Chorching Goh, 2014. "China Economic Update, June 2014," World Bank Other Operational Studies 22108, The World Bank.
    8. Kolleen J. Rask & Norman Rask, 2017. "The Impact of Regime Type on Food Consumption in Low Income Countries," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 59(1), pages 107-125, March.
    9. Martin, William J. & Fukase, Emiko, 2014. "Who Will Feed China in the 21st Century? Income," Proceedings Issues, 2014: Food, Resources and Conflict, December 7-9, 2014, San Diego, California 197164, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    10. Rueda, Ximena & Lambin, Eric F., 2013. "Linking Globalization to Local Land Uses: How Eco-Consumers and Gourmands are Changing the Colombian Coffee Landscapes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 286-301.
    11. Fander Falconí & Juan Cadillo Benalcazar & Freddy Llive Cóndor & Jesus Ramos-Martin & Belén Liger, 2015. "Pérdida de autosuficiencia alimentaria y posibilidades de complementariedad agrícola en los países de UNASUR," Documentos de Trabajo CEPROEC 2015_06, Instituto de Altos Estudios Nacionales, Centro de Prospectiva Estratégica.

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