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Social norms of sharing in high school: Teen giving in the dictator game

  • Eckel, Catherine
  • Grossman, Philip J.
  • Johnson, Cathleen A.
  • de Oliveira, Angela C.M.
  • Rojas, Christian
  • Wilson, Rick

We conduct a study of altruistic behavior among high school students using the dictator game. We find a much stronger norm of equal splitting than previously observed in the typical university student population, with almost 45% of high school subjects choosing an equal split of the endowment. Tests indicate that this difference is not due to factors traditionally considered in the analysis of these games, such as demographics. Rather, we find that dictators who score higher on a Social Generosity measure are much more likely to conform to the 50/50 norm. Additionally, high school students who score in the high range of an Independence measure send significantly less to recipients.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 80 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 603-612

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:80:y:2011:i:3:p:603-612
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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  9. Ruffle, Bradley J., 1998. "More Is Better, But Fair Is Fair: Tipping in Dictator and Ultimatum Games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 247-265, May.
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