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Social preferences in childhood and adolescence. A large-scale experiment to estimate primary and secondary motivations

Author

Listed:
  • Sutter, Matthias
  • Feri, Francesco
  • Glätzle-Rützler, Daniela
  • Kocher, Martin G.
  • Martinsson, Peter
  • Nordblom, Katarina

Abstract

We elicit social preferences of 883 children and teenagers, aged eight to 17 years, in an experiment. Using an econometric mixture model we estimate a subject’s primary and secondary social preference motivations. The secondary motivation indicates the motivation that becomes relevant when the primary motivation implies indifference between various choices. For girls, particularly older ones, maximin-preferences are the most frequent primary motivation, while for boys efficiency concerns are most relevant. Examining secondary motivations reveals that girls are mostly social-welfare-oriented, with strong equity concerns. Boys are also oriented towards social welfare, but are more concerned with efficiency than with equity.

Suggested Citation

  • Sutter, Matthias & Feri, Francesco & Glätzle-Rützler, Daniela & Kocher, Martin G. & Martinsson, Peter & Nordblom, Katarina, 2018. "Social preferences in childhood and adolescence. A large-scale experiment to estimate primary and secondary motivations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 16-30.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:146:y:2018:i:c:p:16-30
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2017.12.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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