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Differential effects of negative publicity on beef consumption according to household characteristics in South Korea

  • Youn, Hyungho
  • Lim, Byung In
  • Jin, Hyun Joung

This paper examines how South Korean households responded to an unprecedented boycott campaign against US beef from spring to summer of 2008, and investigates differential responses in relation to households’ characteristics. It was found that beef consumption reduced by 4.8% immediately after the so-called candle-light demonstration. Instead, pork and chicken consumption increased by 17.2% and 16.6%, respectively. This confirms a substitution effect due to the negative publicity concerning US beef. It was also found that the negative publicity effect was transitory and the reactions of consumers were not uniform; they differed depending on their socio-economic characteristics. The econometric model revealed that younger, less-educated, and/or lower-income households were more susceptible to the negative publicity, and reduced their beef consumption more than other households.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

Volume (Year): 106 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 138-148

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Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:106:y:2012:i:2:p:138-148
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  1. T. S. Breusch & A. R. Pagan, 1980. "The Lagrange Multiplier Test and its Applications to Model Specification in Econometrics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 239-253.
  2. M. P. Burton & T. Young, 1991. "Non-Parametric Tests For Changes In Consumer Preferences For Meat In Great Britain," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(2), pages 138-145.
  3. Jin, Hyun Joung, 2008. "Changes in South Korean consumers' preferences for meat," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 74-84, February.
  4. Schlenker, Wolfram & Villas-Boas, Sofia B, 2008. "Consumer and market responses to mad-cow disease," CUDARE Working Paper Series 1023, University of California at Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy.
  5. David G. Swartz & Ivar E. Strand, Jr., 1981. "Avoidance Costs Associated with Imperfect Information: The Case of Kepone," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 57(2), pages 139-150.
  6. Nicholas E. Piggott & Thomas L. Marsh, 2004. "Does Food Safety Information Impact U.S. Meat Demand?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 154-174.
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