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Decomposition of Ireland's carbon emissions from 1990 to 2010: An extended Kaya identity

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  • Mahony, Tadhg O'

Abstract

In recent decades, Ireland has been an important example of a development pathway where rapid economic growth was accompanied by rising energy demand and increasing carbon emissions. Understanding the driving forces of carbon emissions is necessary for policy formulation and decomposition analysis is widely used for this purpose. This study uses an extended Kaya identity as the scheme and applies the log mean Divisia index (LMDI I) as the decomposition technique. Change in carbon emissions is decomposed from 1990 to 2010 and includes a measure of the effect of renewable energy penetration. Results illustrate that scale effects of affluence and population growth act to increase emissions and are countered primarily by energy intensity and fossil fuel substitution. Renewable energy penetration has a minor effect but has been increasing in recent years. Policy will need to significantly reduce intensity and increase renewables if applicable targets are to be reached. This requires not only a comprehensive suite of policies and measures but emphasis on the development path and ‘non-technical’ change for optimal outcomes.

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  • Mahony, Tadhg O', 2013. "Decomposition of Ireland's carbon emissions from 1990 to 2010: An extended Kaya identity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 573-581.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:59:y:2013:i:c:p:573-581
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.04.013
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    Cited by:

    1. Vaninsky, Alexander, 2014. "Factorial decomposition of CO2 emissions: A generalized Divisia index approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 389-400.
    2. Cansino, José M. & Sánchez-Braza, Antonio & Rodríguez-Arévalo, María L., 2018. "How can Chile move away from a high carbon economy?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 350-366.
    3. Zhao, Xingrong & Zhang, Xi & Shao, Shuai, 2016. "Decoupling CO2 emissions and industrial growth in China over 1993–2013: The role of investment," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 275-292.
    4. Wei Li & Guomin Li & Rongxia Zhang & Wen Sun & Wen Wu & Baihui Jin & Pengfei Cui, 2017. "Carbon Reduction Potential of Resource-Dependent Regions Based on Simulated Annealing Programming Algorithm," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(7), pages 1-17, July.
    5. Guokui Wang & Xingpeng Chen & Zilong Zhang & Chaolan Niu, 2015. "Influencing Factors of Energy-Related CO 2 Emissions in China: A Decomposition Analysis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(10), pages 1-19, October.
    6. Yuzhe Wu & Jiaojiao Luo & Liyin Shen & Martin Skitmore, 2018. "The Effects of an Energy Use Paradigm Shift on Carbon Emissions: A Simulation Study," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(5), pages 1-18, May.
    7. Hongze Li & FengYun Li & Xinhua Yu, 2018. "China’s Contributions to Global Green Energy and Low-Carbon Development: Empirical Evidence under the Belt and Road Framework," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(6), pages 1-32, June.
    8. Luukkanen, Jyrki & Akgün, Orkide & Kaivo-oja, Jari & Korkeakoski, Mika & Pasanen, Tytti & Panula-Ontto, Juha & Vehmas, Jarmo, 2015. "Long-run energy scenarios for Cambodia and Laos: Building an integrated techno-economic and environmental modelling framework for scenario analyses," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 866-881.
    9. Román, Rocío & Cansino, José M. & Rodas, José A., 2018. "Analysis of the main drivers of CO2 emissions changes in Colombia (1990–2012) and its political implications," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 116(PA), pages 402-411.
    10. Zhe Wang & Lin Zhao & Guozhu Mao & Ben Wu, 2015. "Factor Decomposition Analysis of Energy-Related CO 2 Emissions in Tianjin, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(8), pages 1-16, July.

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