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Democratizing access to higher education in Russia: The consequences of the unified state exam reform

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  • Francesconi, Marco
  • Slonimczyk, Fabián
  • Yurko, Anna

Abstract

This is the first paper that evaluates the effects of a reform requiring Russian universities to make admission decisions based on the results of a national high-school exam. We show the reform led to a threefold increase in geographic mobility rates among high-school graduates from small cities and towns to start college. This is robust to different techniques, samples, and specifications. The reform was also accompanied by increases in students’ expectations to attend university, parental transfers, and educational expenditures. There is no evidence the reform affected parental labor supply, divorce, and employment outcomes of graduates who did not move.

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  • Francesconi, Marco & Slonimczyk, Fabián & Yurko, Anna, 2019. "Democratizing access to higher education in Russia: The consequences of the unified state exam reform," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 56-82.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:117:y:2019:i:c:p:56-82
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2019.04.007
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    Cited by:

    1. Wadim Strielkowski & Vyacheslav Volchik & Artyom Maskaev & Pavel Savko, 2020. "Leadership and Effective Institutional Economics Design in the Context of Education Reforms," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(2), pages 1-15, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human capital investment; Student migration; University admission; Educational inequalities; Wider participation;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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