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What High-Achieving Low-Income Students Know About College

Author

Listed:
  • Caroline Hoxby
  • Sarah Turner

Abstract

Previous work (Hoxby and Avery 2014) shows that low-income higher achievers tend not to apply to selective colleges despite being extremely likely to be admitted with financial aid so generous that they would pay less than they do to attend the non-selective schools they usually attend. The Expanding College Opportunities project is a randomized controlled trial that provides such students with individualized information about the college application process and colleges' net prices. In other work (Hoxby and Turner 2013), we show that the informational intervention substantially raises students' probability of applying to, being admitted at, enrolling at, and progressing at selective colleges. In this study, we show that the intervention actually changes students' informedness on key topics such as the cost of college, the availability of the curricula and peers they seek, and the different types of colleges available to them. We highlight topics on which the control students, who experienced no intervention, are seriously misinformed.

Suggested Citation

  • Caroline Hoxby & Sarah Turner, 2015. "What High-Achieving Low-Income Students Know About College," NBER Working Papers 20861, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:20861
    Note: ED LS PE
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    1. Elite universities and social mobility
      by nawmsayn in ZeeConomics on 2015-02-08 20:26:59

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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Lergetporer & Katharina Werner & Ludger Wößmann & Ludger Woessmann, 2018. "Does Ignorance of Economic Returns and Costs Explain the Educational Aspiration Gap? Evidence from Representative Survey Experiments," CESifo Working Paper Series 7000, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Ran I. Shorrer & Sandor Sovago, 2017. "Obvious Mistakes in a Strategically Simple College Admissions Environment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-107/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Lergetporer, Philipp & Woessmann, Ludger, 2019. "The Political Economy of Higher Education Finance: How Information and Design Affect Public Preferences for Tuition," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 145, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    4. Lisa J. Dettling & Sarena Goodman & Jonathan Smith, 2018. "Every Little Bit Counts: The Impact of High-Speed Internet on the Transition to College," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(2), pages 260-273, May.
    5. repec:eee:eecrev:v:117:y:2019:i:c:p:56-82 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Peter Arcidiacono & Esteban M. Aucejo & V. Joseph Hotz, 2016. "University Differences in the Graduation of Minorities in STEM Fields: Evidence from California," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(3), pages 525-562, March.
    7. Carlana, Michela & La Ferrara, Eliana & Pinotti, Paolo, 2017. "Goals and Gaps: Educational Careers of Immigrant Children," CEPR Discussion Papers 12538, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:64:y:2018:i:c:p:313-342 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Damgaard, Mette Trier & Nielsen, Helena Skyt, 2018. "Nudging in education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 313-342.
    10. repec:ces:ifobei:82 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Lucia Rizzica, 2018. "Raising aspirations and higher education: evidence from the UK’s Widening Participation policy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1188, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    12. Stuart Campbell & Lindsey Macmillan & Richard Murphy & Gill Wyness, 2019. "Inequalities in Student to Course Match: Evidence from Linked Administrative Data," CEP Discussion Papers dp1647, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Roberto Galbiati & Aurélie Ouss & Arnaud Philippe, 2015. "Jobs, News and Re-offending after Incarceration," Sciences Po publications 41, Sciences Po.
    14. Hastings, Justine S. & Neilson, Christopher A. & Ramirez, Anely & Zimmerman, Seth D., 2016. "(Un)informed college and major choice: Evidence from linked survey and administrative data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 136-151.
    15. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:56:y:2018:i:2:p:1220-1243 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:eee:epplan:v:72:y:2019:i:c:p:40-53 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Machado, Cecilia & Szerman, Christiane, 2016. "Centralized Admission and the Student-College Match," IZA Discussion Papers 10251, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Kristian Koerselman, 2019. "Why Finnish polytechnics reject top applicants," Papers 1908.05443, arXiv.org.
    19. repec:eee:injoed:v:58:y:2018:i:c:p:137-148 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Werner, Katharina, 2018. "Obstacles to Efficient Allocations of Public Education Spending," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 128, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    21. William R. Johnson, 2017. "Parties or Problem Sets: Review Article on How College Works and Paying for the Party," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(1), pages 136-147, March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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