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Parent–teacher meetings and student outcomes: Evidence from a developing country

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  • Islam, Asad

Abstract

We conduct a randomized field experiment involving regularly scheduled face-to-face meetings between teachers and parents over a period of two academic years. At each of these meetings, the teacher provided the parents with a report card and discussed the child's academic progress. We find that the overall test scores of the students in the treatment schools compared to control schools increased by 0.26 SD in the first year, and 0.38 SD by the end of the second year. The program also resulted in improvements in both student attitudes and behavior, and teachers’ pedagogical practices. The intervention encouraged parents to spend more time assisting their children and monitoring their school work. The treatment effects are robust across parental, teacher, and school-level characteristics, and the findings indicate that programs for stimulating parent–teacher interactions are cost-effective, easy to implement, and easy to scale up.

Suggested Citation

  • Islam, Asad, 2019. "Parent–teacher meetings and student outcomes: Evidence from a developing country," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 273-304.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:111:y:2019:i:c:p:273-304
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2018.09.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Islam, Asadul & Lee, Wang-Sheng & Nicholas, Aaron, 2019. "The Effects of Chess Instruction on Academic and Non-Cognitive Outcomes: Field Experimental Evidence from a Developing Country," IZA Discussion Papers 12550, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Parent-teacher meeting; Educational outcomes; Field experiments; Bangladesh;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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