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The Impact of Maternal Literacy and Participation Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in India

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  • Rukmini Banerji
  • James Berry
  • Marc Shotland

Abstract

Using a randomized field experiment in India, we evaluate the effectiveness of adult literacy and parental involvement interventions in improving children's learning. Households were assigned to receive either adult literacy (language and math) classes for mothers, training for mothers on how to enhance their children's learning at home, or a combination of the two programs. All three interventions had significant but modest impacts on childrens math scores. The interventions also increased mothers' test scores in both language and math, as well as a range of other outcomes reflecting greater involvement of mothers in their children's education.

Suggested Citation

  • Rukmini Banerji & James Berry & Marc Shotland, 2017. "The Impact of Maternal Literacy and Participation Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 303-337, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejapp:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:303-37
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/app.20150390
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Asadul Islam, 2017. "Parental Involvement in Education: Evidence from Field Experiments in Developing Countries," Monash Economics Working Papers 02-17, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. Islam, Asad, 2019. "Parent–teacher meetings and student outcomes: Evidence from a developing country," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 273-304.
    3. Deshpande, Ashwini & Desrochers, Alain & Ksoll, Christopher & Shonchoy, Abu S., 2017. "The Impact of a Computer-based Adult Literacy Program on Literacy and Numeracy: Evidence from India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 451-473.
    4. James Berry & Rebecca Dizon-Ross & Maulik Jagnani, 2020. "Not Playing Favorites: An Experiment on Parental Fairness Preferences," Working Papers 2020-06, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    5. Miaari, Sami H. & Lee, Ines, 2020. "Obstacles on the Road to School: The Impacts of Mobility Restrictions on Educational Performance," IZA Discussion Papers 13563, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Julia A. Barde & Juliana Walkiewicz, 2014. "Access to Piped Water and Human Capital Formation - Evidence from Brazilian Primary Schools," Discussion Paper Series 28, Department of International Economic Policy, University of Freiburg, revised Jul 2014.
    7. Miaari, S. & Lee, I, 2020. "Obstacles on the Road to School: The Impacts of Mobility Restrictions on Educational Performance," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 2074, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    8. Christopher Ksoll, Janny Aker, Danielle Miller, Karla C. Perez-Mendoza, and Susan L. Smalley, 2014. "Learning without Teachers? A Randomized Experiment of a Mobile Phone-Based Adult Education Program in Los Angeles - Working Paper 368," Working Papers 368, Center for Global Development.
    9. Christophe Jalil Nordman & Smriti Sharma & Naveen Sunder, 2020. "Here Comes the Rain Again: Productivity Shocks, Educational Investments and Child Work," Working Papers DT/2020/05, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    10. Alejandro J. Ganimian & Richard J. Murnane, 2014. "Improving Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: Lessons from Rigorous Impact Evaluations," NBER Working Papers 20284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Annika B. Bergbauer, 2019. "How Did EU Membership of Eastern Europe Affect Student Achievement?," ifo Working Paper Series 299, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    12. Eric Bettinger & Nina Cunha & Guilherme Lichand & Ricardo Madeira, 2020. "Are the effects of informational interventions driven by salience?," ECON - Working Papers 350, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised May 2021.
    13. Naveen Sunder, 2019. "Marriage Age, Social Status, and Intergenerational Effects in Uganda," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(6), pages 2123-2146, December.
    14. Clément de Chaisemartin & Jaime Ramirez-Cuellar, 2020. "At What Level Should One Cluster Standard Errors in Paired Experiments, and in Stratified Experiments with Small Strata?," NBER Working Papers 27609, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Natalie Obergruber, 2018. "Mikroökonometrische Analyse der individuellen und institutionellen Determinanten von Bildung und Berufswahl," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 80, August.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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