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Environmental and ecological economics in the 21st century: An age adjusted citation analysis of the influential articles, journals, authors and institutions

Listed author(s):
  • Hoepner, Andreas G.F.
  • Kant, Benjamin
  • Scholtens, Bert
  • Yu, Pei-Shan

We investigate the influence of articles, authors, journals and institutions in the field of environmental and ecological economics. We depart from studies that investigated the literature until 2001 and include a time period that has witnessed an enormous increase of importance in the field. We adjust for the age effect given the huge impact of the year of an article's publication on its influence and we show that this adjustment does make a substantial difference — especially for disaggregated units of analysis with diverse age characteristics such as articles or authors. We analyse 6597 studies on environmental and ecological economics published between 2000 and 2009. We provide rankings of the influential articles, authors, journals and institutions and find that Ecological Economics, Energy Economics and the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management have the most influential articles, they publish very influential authors and their articles are cited most. The University of Maryland, Resources for the Future, the University of East Anglia and the World Bank appear to be the most influential institutions in the field of environmental and ecological economics.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800912001140
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 77 (2012)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 193-206

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:77:y:2012:i:c:p:193-206
DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2012.03.002
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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  1. Engel, Stefanie & Pagiola, Stefano & Wunder, Sven, 2008. "Designing payments for environmental services in theory and practice: An overview of the issues," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 663-674, May.
  2. Rik Pieters & Hans Baumgartner, 2002. "Who Talks to Whom? Intra- and Interdisciplinary Communication of Economics Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 483-509, June.
  3. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
  4. Smith, V. Kerry, 2000. "JEEM and Non-market Valuation: 1974-1998," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 351-374, May.
  5. de Groot, Rudolf S. & Wilson, Matthew A. & Boumans, Roelof M. J., 2002. "A typology for the classification, description and valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 393-408, June.
  6. Christiana E. Hilmer & Michael J. Hilmer, 2005. "How Do Journal Quality, Co-Authorship, and Author Order Affect Agricultural Economists' Salaries?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(2), pages 509-523.
  7. Lee, Chien-Chiang, 2005. "Energy consumption and GDP in developing countries: A cointegrated panel analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 415-427, May.
  8. Alexander, John C & Mabry, Rodney H, 1994. " Relative Significance of Journals, Authors, and Articles Cited in Financial Research," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(2), pages 697-712, June.
  9. Matti Keloharju, 2008. "What's New in Finance?," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 14(3), pages 564-608.
  10. Costanza, Robert & Stern, David & Fisher, Brendan & He, Lining & Ma, Chunbo, 2004. "Influential publications in ecological economics: a citation analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3-4), pages 261-292, October.
  11. E. Han Kim & Adair Morse & Luigi Zingales, 2006. "What Has Mattered to Economics Since 1970," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(4), pages 189-202, Fall.
  12. Elena G. Irwin, 2002. "The Effects of Open Space on Residential Property Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(4), pages 465-480.
  13. John List & Craig Gallet, 2001. "What Experimental Protocol Influence Disparities Between Actual and Hypothetical Stated Values?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 20(3), pages 241-254, November.
  14. Kenneth A. Borokhovich & Robert J. Bricker & Betty J. Simkins, 2000. "An Analysis of Finance Journal Impact Factors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(3), pages 1457-1469, June.
  15. Auffhammer, Maximilian & Carson, Richard T., 2008. "Forecasting the path of China's CO2 emissions using province-level information," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 229-247, May.
  16. Sandra Rousseau & Tom Verbeke & Ronald Rousseau, 2009. "Evaluating Environmental and Resource Economics Journals: A TOP-Curve Approach," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(2), pages 270-287, Summer.
  17. Ma, Chunbo & Stern, David I., 2006. "Environmental and ecological economics: A citation analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 491-506, June.
  18. Turner, R. Kerry & Paavola, Jouni & Cooper, Philip & Farber, Stephen & Jessamy, Valma & Georgiou, Stavros, 2003. "Valuing nature: lessons learned and future research directions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 493-510, October.
  19. Borokhovich, Kenneth A & Bricker, Robert J & Simkins, Betty J, 1994. " Journal Communication and Influence in Financial Research," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(2), pages 713-725, June.
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