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What Has Mattered to Economics Since 1970

  • E. Han Kim
  • Adair Morse
  • Luigi Zingales

We compile the list of articles published in major refereed economics journals during the last 35 years that have received more than 500 citations. We document major shifts in the mode of contribution and in the importance of different sub-fields: Theory loses out to empirical work, and micro and macro give way to growth and development in the 1990s. While we do not witness any decline in the primacy of production in the United States over the period, the concentration of institutions within the U.S. hosting and training authors of the highly-cited articles has declined substantially.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w12526.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12526.

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Date of creation: Sep 2006
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Publication status: published as Kim, Han, Adair Morse, and Luigi Zingales. “What Has Mattered to Economics Since 1970." Journal of Economic Perspectives 20, 4 (2006): 189-202.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12526
Note: EFG IO ITI PE POL PR
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  1. E. Han Kim & Adair Morse & Luigi Zingales, 2006. "Are Elite Universities Losing Their Competitive Edge?," NBER Working Papers 12245, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Richard H. Thaler, 2008. "Mental Accounting and Consumer Choice," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 27(1), pages 15-25, 01-02.
  3. Tom Arnold, 2003. "Impact: What Influences Finance Research?," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76(2), pages 343-362, April.
  4. Richard Dusansky & Clayton J. Vernon, 1998. "Rankings of U.S. Economics Departments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 157-170, Winter.
  5. Tom Coupé, 2003. "Revealed Performances: Worldwide Rankings of Economists and Economics Departments, 1990-2000," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(6), pages 1309-1345, December.
  6. Graves, Philip E & Marchand, James R & Thompson, Randal, 1982. "Economics Departmental Rankings: Research Incentives, Constraints, and Efficiency," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(5), pages 1131-41, December.
  7. Lucas, Robert E., 1977. "Understanding business cycles," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 7-29, January.
  8. Adair Morse, 2006. "Are elite universities losing their competitive edge?," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
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  1. Rankings of Economists, Economics Departments and Economics Journals

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