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Elitism and Stochastic Dominance


  • Stephen Bazen

    () (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - ECM - Ecole Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales)

  • Patrick Moyes

    () (GREThA - Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée - UB - Université de Bordeaux - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)


Stochastic dominance has typically been used with a special emphasis on risk and inequality reduction something captured by the concavity of the utility function in the expected utility model. We claim that the applicability of the stochastic dominance approach goes far beyond risk and inequality measurement provided suitable adpations be made. We apply in the paper the stochastic dominance approach to the measurment of elitism which may be considered the opposite of egalitarianism. While the usual stochastic dominance quasi-orderings attach more value to more equal and more efficient distributions, our criteria ensure that the more unequal and the more the efficient the distribution, the higher it is ranked. two instances are provided by (i) comparisons of scientific performance across institutions like universities or departments and (ii) comparisons of affluence as opposed to poverty across countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Bazen & Patrick Moyes, 2011. "Elitism and Stochastic Dominance," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00576585, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:halshs-00576585
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Peichl, Andreas & Pestel, Nico, 2010. "Multidimensional Measurement of Richness: Theory and an Application to Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 4825, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Nicolas CARAYOL & Agenor LAHATTE, 2014. "Dominance relations and ranking when quantity and quality both matter: Applications to US universities and econ. departments worldwide," Cahiers du GREThA 2014-14, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    3. Stephen Bazen & Patrick Moyes, 2012. "Elitism and stochastic dominance," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 39(1), pages 207-251, June.
    4. Paul Makdissi & Myra Yazbeck, 2015. "On the measurement of plutonomy," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(4), pages 703-717, April.
    5. Bouyssou, Denis & Marchant, Thierry, 2014. "An axiomatic approach to bibliometric rankings and indices," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 449-477.
    6. Nicolas CARAYOL (GREThA) & Agenor LAHATTE (OST), 2011. "Dominance relations when both quantity and quality matter, and applications to the\r\ncomparison of US research universities and worldwide top departments in economics," Cahiers du GREThA 2011-22, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.

    More about this item


    Decumulative distribution functions; Stochastic dominance; Regressive transfers; Elitism; Scientific Performance; Affluence;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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