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Can the ageing North benefit from expanding trade with the South?

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  • Georges, Patrick
  • Lisenkova, Katerina
  • Mérette, Marcel

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the benefit for the ageing North countries of diversifying some of their trade away from other North countries in favour of South countries. To this end we use a six-region overlapping generations model that takes into account the demographic trends of the 21st century and trade patterns. We show that ageing North countries can benefit from “enriching decay” through significant improvement in terms of trade. We estimate to what extent enriching decay can be bolstered if the North expands trade with the South. In Europe and Japan, for instance, an appropriate trade diversification strategy may prop up real per capita consumption by 2% and 2.4% respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Georges, Patrick & Lisenkova, Katerina & Mérette, Marcel, 2013. "Can the ageing North benefit from expanding trade with the South?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 990-998.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:35:y:2013:i:c:p:990-998
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2013.09.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Patrick Georges, 2017. "Canada’s Trade Policy Options under Donald Trump: NAFTA’s rules of origin, Canada-U.S. security perimeter, and Canada’s geographical trade diversification opportunities," Working Papers 1707E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    2. Georges, Patrick & Seçkin, Aylin, 2016. "From pro-natalist rhetoric to population policies in Turkey? An OLG general equilibrium analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 79-93.
    3. Kolasa, Aleksandra & Rubaszek, Michał, 2016. "The effect of ageing on the European economies in a life-cycle model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 50-57.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    OLG-CGE modelling; Population ageing; International trade; North vs. South;

    JEL classification:

    • E17 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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