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The Impact of Population Ageing on Technological Progress and TFP Growth, with Application to United States: 1950-2050

  • Izmirlioglu, Yusuf
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    I examine the effect of age-distribution of the society on economic growth through technological progress. I build a multisector economy model that involves population pyramid. I characterize the steady-state of the model for low and high population growth rate. Higher population growth rate yields faster TFP and output growth in the long-run. I analyze dynamic behavior of the economy. I calibrate the model for United States, 1950-2000 and using the estimated parameters I make predictions about the impact of population ageing on economic growth.

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/24687/1/MPRA_paper_24687.pdf
    File Function: original version
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 24687.

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    Date of creation: 05 Dec 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24687
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    Web page: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

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    1. Domeij, David & Flodén, Martin, 2003. "Population Aging and International Capital Flows," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 539, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 21 Oct 2003.
    2. Bernt Bratsberg & James F. Ragan & Jr & John T. Warren, 2003. "Negative returns to seniority: New evidence in academic markets," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(2), pages 306-323, January.
    3. Miles, David K, 1997. "Modelling the Impact of Demographic Change Upon the Economy," CEPR Discussion Papers 1762, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Cutler, D.M. & Poterba, J.M. & Sheiner, L.M. & Summers, L.H., 1990. "An Aging Society: Opportunity Or Challenge," Working papers 553, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    5. repec:fth:harver:1490 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Hans Fehr & Sabine Jokisch & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 2005. "Will China Eat Our Lunch or Take Us Out to Dinner? Simulating the Transition Paths of the U.S., EU, Japan, and China," NBER Working Papers 11668, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hippolyte D'Albis, 2007. "Demographic structure and capital accumulation," Post-Print hal-00630200, HAL.
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