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Long work hours and health in China

Listed author(s):
  • Nie, Peng
  • Otterbach, Steffen
  • Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

Using several waves of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), this study analyzes the effect of long work hours on health and lifestyles in a sample of 18- to 65-year-old Chinese workers. Although working long hours does significantly increase the probabilities of high blood pressure and poorer reported health, the effects are small. Also small are the negative effects of long work hours on sleep time, fat intake, and the probabilities of sports participation or watching TV. We find no positive association between work time and different measures of obesity and no evidence of any association with calorie intake, food preparation and cooking time, or the sedentary activities of reading, writing, or drawing. In general, after controlling for a rich set of covariates and unobserved individual heterogeneity, we find little evidence that long work hours affect either the health or lifestyles of Chinese workers.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1043951X15000280
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 33 (2015)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 212-229

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Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:33:y:2015:i:c:p:212-229
DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2015.02.004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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  1. Guifu Chen & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2013. "Formal And Informal Employment And Income Differentials In Urban China," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(7), pages 987-1004, October.
  2. Steffen Otterbach, 2010. "Mismatches Between Actual and Preferred Work Time: Empirical Evidence of Hours Constraints in 21 Countries," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 143-161, June.
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  9. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Work Hours in Chinese Enterprises: Evidence From Matched Employer-Employee Data," Monash Economics Working Papers 10-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
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  13. repec:adr:anecst:y:2012:i:105-106:p:3 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2004. "How Important is Methodology for the estimates of the determinants of Happiness?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 641-659, 07.
  15. Russell Smyth & Xiaolei Qian & Ingrid Nielsen & Ines Kaempfer, 2013. "Working Hours in Supply Chain Chinese and Thai Factories: Evidence from the Fair Labor Association's ‘Soccer Project’," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 51(2), pages 382-408, 06.
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