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Wage Expectations for Higher Education Students in Spain

Author

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  • César Alonso-Borrego
  • Antonio Romero-Medina

Abstract

We use data on expected wages self-reported by college students to assess the hypothesis that the positive gap between expected and actual wages would decrease as students approach graduation. Our estimation results confirm this hypothesis. The amount and the quality of student information, used to forecast wages, improves with student experience. We find that expected wages for first-year students are affected not only by the degree type and academic performance, but also by the variables determining their degree preferences and their household environment. In the case of junior students, the degree type and length affects expected wages, though neither pre-university performance nor household environment influence their wage forecasts
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Suggested Citation

  • César Alonso-Borrego & Antonio Romero-Medina, 2016. "Wage Expectations for Higher Education Students in Spain," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 30(1), pages 1-17, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:30:y:2016:i:1:p:1-17
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/labr.12072
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Claire Bonnard & Jean-François Giret & Marielle Lambert-Le Mener, 2013. "Les étudiants anticipent-ils correctement la valeur de leur diplôme sur le marché du travail ?," Post-Print halshs-00815912, HAL.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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