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Children's educational progress: partitioning family, school and area effects

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  • Jon Rasbash
  • George Leckie
  • Rebecca Pillinger
  • Jennifer Jenkins

Abstract

Summary. School effectiveness analyses have largely ignored the role of the family as an important source of variation for children's educational progress. Sibling analyses in developmental psychology and behavioural genetics have largely ignored sources of shared environmental variation beyond the immediate family. We formulate a multilevel cross‐classified model that examines variation in children's progress during secondary schooling and partitions this variability into pupil, family, primary school, secondary school, local education authority and residential area. Our results suggest that about 50% of what has been labelled as pupil variation in school effectiveness models is really between‐family variation and that about 22% of the total variance is due to shared environments beyond the immediate family.

Suggested Citation

  • Jon Rasbash & George Leckie & Rebecca Pillinger & Jennifer Jenkins, 2010. "Children's educational progress: partitioning family, school and area effects," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(3), pages 657-682, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:173:y:2010:i:3:p:657-682
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-985X.2010.00642.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Schnepf, Sylke V. & Durrant, Gabriele B. & Micklewright, John, 2014. "Which Schools and Pupils Respond to Educational Achievement Surveys? A Focus on the English PISA Sample," IZA Discussion Papers 8411, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Juan Merlo & Philippe Wagner & Nermin Ghith & George Leckie, 2016. "An Original Stepwise Multilevel Logistic Regression Analysis of Discriminatory Accuracy: The Case of Neighbourhoods and Health," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(4), pages 1-31, April.
    4. Isabella Sulis & Mariano Porcu, 2015. "Assessing Divergences in Mathematics and Reading Achievement in Italian Primary Schools: A Proposal of Adjusted Indicators of School Effectiveness," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 607-634, June.
    5. Gabriele B. Durrant & Sylke V. Schnepf, 2018. "Which schools and pupils respond to educational achievement surveys?: a focus on the English Programme for International Student Assessment sample," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 181(4), pages 1057-1075, October.
    6. Cheung, Connie & Goodman, Deborah & Leckie, George & Jenkins, Jennifer M., 2011. "Understanding contextual effects on externalizing behaviors in children in out-of-home care: Influence of workers and foster families," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 2050-2060, October.
    7. Daniele, Vittorio, 2021. "Socioeconomic inequality and regional disparities in educational achievement: The role of relative poverty," Intelligence, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).
    8. Cheti Nicoletti & Birgitta Rabe, 2013. "Inequality in Pupils' Test Scores: How Much do Family, Sibling Type and Neighbourhood Matter?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 80(318), pages 197-218, April.
    9. Mike Smet & Barbara Janssens, 2014. "Determinants of the choice for professional teacher education programs: A multinomial multilevel approach," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9, in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 41, pages 797-815, Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    10. Tommaso Agasisti & Patrizia Falzetti & Mara Soncin, 2016. "Italian school principals’ managerial behaviors and students’ test scores: an empirical analysis," Working papers 43, Società Italiana di Economia Pubblica.
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