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Sibling, peer, neighbor, and schoolmate correlations as indicators of the importance of context for adolescent development

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  • Greg Duncan

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  • Johanne Boisjoly
  • Kathleen Mullan Harris

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Greg Duncan & Johanne Boisjoly & Kathleen Mullan Harris, 2001. "Sibling, peer, neighbor, and schoolmate correlations as indicators of the importance of context for adolescent development," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(3), pages 437-447, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:38:y:2001:i:3:p:437-447
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2001.0026
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.2001.0026
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lin, Xu, 2014. "Peer effects in adolescents' delinquent behaviors: Evidence from a binary choice network model," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 73-92.
    2. Nadir Altinok & Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2015. "The Unfolding of Gender Gap in Education," Working Papers halshs-01204805, HAL.
    3. Minja Kim Choe & Larry L. Bumpass & Noriko O. Tsuya & Ronald R. Rindfuss, 2014. "Nontraditional Family-Related Attitudes in Japan: Macro and Micro Determinants," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(2), pages 241-271, June.
    4. Sabino Kornrich & Frank Furstenberg, 2013. "Investing in Children: Changes in Parental Spending on Children, 1972–2007," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(1), pages 1-23, February.
    5. Aughinbaugh, Alison & Gittleman, Maury, 2004. "Maternal employment and adolescent risky behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 815-838, July.
    6. Lin, Xu & Weinberg, Bruce A., 2014. "Unrequited friendship? How reciprocity mediates adolescent peer effects," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 144-153.
    7. Xia, Xiaoyu, 2016. "Forming wage expectations through learning: Evidence from college major choices," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PA), pages 176-196.
    8. Lisa Sanbonmatsu & Jeffrey R. Kling & Greg J. Duncan & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, 2006. "Neighborhoods and Academic Achievement: Results from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(4).
    9. Xu Lin, 2010. "Identifying Peer Effects in Student Academic Achievement by Spatial Autoregressive Models with Group Unobservables," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(4), pages 825-860, October.
    10. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0635-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Tom Kleinepier & Maarten van Ham, 2017. "The temporal stability of children's neighborhood experiences: A follow-up from birth to age 15," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(59), pages 1813-1826, June.
    12. Elisabeth Bügelmayer & Daniel D. Schnitzlein, 2014. "Is It the Family or the Neighborhood?: Evidence from Sibling and Neighbor Correlations in Youth Education and Health," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 716, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    13. Roos, Leslie L. & Brownell, Marni & Lix, Lisa & Roos, Noralou P. & Walld, Randy & MacWilliam, Leonard, 2008. "From health research to social research: Privacy, methods, approaches," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 117-129, January.
    14. Susan Clampet-Lundquist & Greg J. Duncan & Kathryn Edin & Jeffrey R. Kling, 2006. "Moving At-Risk Teenagers Out of High-Risk Neighborhoods: Why Girls Fare Better Than Boys," Working Papers 888, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    15. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:63:y:2018:i:c:p:64-77 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:pri:indrel:dsp019306sz29r is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Xu Lin, 2015. "Utilizing spatial autoregressive models to identify peer effects among adolescents," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(3), pages 929-960, November.

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