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Does Zero Tillage Improve the Livelihoods of Smallholder Cropping Farmers?

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Listed:
  • Tamer El-Shater
  • Yigezu A. Yigezu
  • Amin Mugera
  • Colin Piggin
  • Atef Haddad
  • Yaseen Khalil
  • Stephen Loss
  • A. Aw-Hassan

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Tamer El-Shater & Yigezu A. Yigezu & Amin Mugera & Colin Piggin & Atef Haddad & Yaseen Khalil & Stephen Loss & A. Aw-Hassan, 2016. "Does Zero Tillage Improve the Livelihoods of Smallholder Cropping Farmers?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(1), pages 154-172, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jageco:v:67:y:2016:i:1:p:154-172
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1477-9552.12133
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel L. Millimet & Rusty Tchernis, 2013. "Estimation Of Treatment Effects Without An Exclusion Restriction: With An Application To The Analysis Of The School Breakfast Program," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(6), pages 982-1017, September.
    2. Shiferaw, Bekele & Kassie, Menale & Jaleta, Moti & Yirga, Chilot, 2014. "Adoption of improved wheat varieties and impacts on household food security in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 272-284.
    3. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra Todd, 1998. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 261-294.
    4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    5. Marco Caliendo & Sabine Kopeinig, 2008. "Some Practical Guidance For The Implementation Of Propensity Score Matching," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 31-72, February.
    6. Bekele A. Shiferaw & Tewodros A. Kebede & Liang You, 2008. "Technology adoption under seed access constraints and the economic impacts of improved pigeonpea varieties in Tanzania," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(3), pages 309-323, November.
    7. P. Kristjanson & I. Okike & S. Tarawali & B. B. Singh & V. M. Manyong, 2005. "Farmers' perceptions of benefits and factors affecting the adoption of improved dual‐purpose cowpea in the dry savannas of Nigeria," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(2), pages 195-210, March.
    8. Knowler, Duncan & Bradshaw, Ben, 2007. "Farmers' adoption of conservation agriculture: A review and synthesis of recent research," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 25-48, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paudel, G. & Krishna, V. & McDonald, A., 2018. "Why some inferior technologies succeed? Examining the diffusion and impacts of rotavator tillage in Nepal Terai," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277149, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Hein, Yarzar & Vijitsrikamol, Kampanat & Attavanich, Witsanu & Janekarnkij, Penporn, 2019. "Economic Assessment of Climate Adaptation Options in Myanmar Rice-Based Farming System," MPRA Paper 93587, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2019.
    3. Yigezu, Yigezu A. & Alwang, Jeffrey & Rahman, M. Wakilur & Mollah, M. Bazlur R. & El-Shater, Tamer & Aw-Hassan, Aden & Sarker, Ashutosh, 2019. "Is DNA fingerprinting the gold standard for estimation of adoption and impacts of improved lentil varieties?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 48-59.
    4. Hambulo Ngoma, 2018. "Does minimum tillage improve the livelihood outcomes of smallholder farmers in Zambia?," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(2), pages 381-396, April.
    5. Zewdu Ayalew Abro & Moti Jaleta & Hailemariam Teklewold, 2018. "Does Intensive Tillage Enhance Productivity and Reduce Risk Exposure? Panel Data Evidence from Smallholders’ Agriculture in Ethiopia," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(3), pages 756-776, September.

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