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Macroeconomic Stability, Financial Stability, and Monetary Policy Rules

Author

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  • Pierre-Richard Agénor
  • Luiz A. Pereira da Silva

Abstract

This paper reviews arguments for and against attributing explicitly a financial stability objective to monetary policy. The discussion is conducted from the perspective of middle-income countries (MICs), where bank credit plays a critical role both on the supply and demand sides. It also discusses, assuming that a more proactive role is desirable, what monetary policy should react to, to what extent it should be combined with macroprudential regulation (and possibly capital controls), and whether existing models provide adequate benchmarks for studying how these policies interact. The analysis suggests that, on balance, there may be a good case for monetary policy in MICs to go beyond its conventional mandate and address the time dimension of systemic risk—if only during a transitory period, as more is learnt about the implementation and performance of the new macroprudential rules that are currently being discussed.
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Suggested Citation

  • Pierre-Richard Agénor & Luiz A. Pereira da Silva, 2012. "Macroeconomic Stability, Financial Stability, and Monetary Policy Rules," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 205-224, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:intfin:v:15:y:2012:i:2:p:205-224
    DOI: 10.1111/infi.2012.15.issue-2
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/10.1111/infi.2012.15.issue-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ricardo J. Caballero, 2010. "Macroeconomics after the Crisis: Time to Deal with the Pretense-of-Knowledge Syndrome," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 85-102, Fall.
    2. Agénor, P.-R. & Alper, K. & Pereira da Silva, L., 2012. "Capital requirements and business cycles with credit market imperfections," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 687-705.
    3. Broto, Carmen & Díaz-Cassou, Javier & Erce, Aitor, 2011. "Measuring and explaining the volatility of capital flows to emerging countries," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1941-1953, August.
    4. Katrin Assenmacher-Wesche & Stefan Gerlach, 2010. "Monetary policy and financial imbalances: facts and fiction," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 25, pages 437-482, July.
    5. Clark, Peter B. & Goodhart, Charles A. E. & Huang, Haizhou, 1999. "Optimal monetary policy rules in a rational expectations model of the Phillips curve," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 497-520, April.
    6. Alan S. Blinder, 2010. "How Central Should the Central Bank Be?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(1), pages 123-133, March.
    7. Akira Ariyoshi & Andrei A Kirilenko & Inci Ötker & Bernard J Laurens & Jorge I Canales Kriljenko & Karl F Habermeier, 2000. "Capital Controls; Country Experiences with Their Use and Liberalization," IMF Occasional Papers 190, International Monetary Fund.
    8. repec:pri:cepsud:198blinder is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Krug, Sebastian, 2015. "The interaction between monetary and macroprudential policy: Should central banks "lean against the wind" to foster macrofinancial stability?," Economics Working Papers 2015-08, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    2. Canuto, Otaviano & Cavallari, Matheus, 2013. "Monetary policy and macroprudential regulation : whither emerging markets," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6310, The World Bank.
    3. repec:taf:oabmxx:v:3:y:2016:i:1:p:1154283 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Krug, Sebastian & Wohltmann, Hans-Werner, 2016. "Shadow banking, financial regulation and animal spirits: An ACE approach," Economics Working Papers 2016-08, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    5. Mara Pirovano, 2013. "Household and firm leverage, capital flows and monetary policy in a small open economy," Working Paper Research 246, National Bank of Belgium.
    6. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Zilberman, Roy, 2015. "Loan Loss Provisioning Rules, Procyclicality, and Financial Volatility," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 301-315.
    7. Käfer Benjamin, 2014. "The Taylor Rule and Financial Stability – A Literature Review with Application for the Eurozone," Review of Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 65(2), pages 159-192, August.
    8. repec:zbw:ifweej:20187 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Juan Guillermo Bedoya Ospina, 2017. "Ciclos de crédito, liquidez global y regímenes monetarios: una aproximación para América Latina," REVISTA DESARROLLO Y SOCIEDAD, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE, vol. 78, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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