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NAFTA or Nada? Trade's Impact on U.S. Border Retailers

Author

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  • TIMOTHY C. FORD
  • BRIAN LOGAN
  • JENNIFER LOGAN

Abstract

The extensive debate over trade liberalization policies in the United States holds a general consensus that some industries will benefit while others will not. This paper explores the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement on U.S. retailers in states located along the border with Mexico. Overall, the impact of trade on U.S. border retailers has been beneficial. However, the results demonstrate that retailers in the region are vulnerable to exchange rate fluctuations and other macroeconomic influences that change the relative price ratio between the United States and Mexico. Furthermore, retailers in metropolitan statistical areas that have a relatively high concentration of retail sector employment are more susceptible to these changes. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy C. Ford & Brian Logan & Jennifer Logan, 2009. "NAFTA or Nada? Trade's Impact on U.S. Border Retailers," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 260-286.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:growch:v:40:y:2009:i:2:p:260-286
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrés Rodríguez‐Pose, 2012. "Trade and Regional Inequality," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 88(2), pages 109-136, April.
    2. Roberto Ezcurra & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 2014. "Trade Openness and Spatial Inequality in Emerging Countries," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 162-182, June.

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