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Timothy C. Ford

Personal Details

First Name:Timothy
Middle Name:C.
Last Name:Ford
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pfo223
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Economics
California State University-Sacramento

Sacramento, California (United States)
http://www.csus.edu/econ/

: (916) 278-6223
(916) 278-5768
Tahoe Hall, 3rd Floor, Room 3028, 6000 "J" Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6082
RePEc:edi:decssus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Timothy Ford & Bruce Elmslie, 2011. "Scale effects found!," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(26), pages 3883-3890.
  2. Ford, Timothy C. & Rork, Jonathan C., 2010. "Why buy what you can get for free? The effect of foreign direct investment on state patent rates," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 72-81, July.
  3. Timothy C. Ford & Brian Logan & Jennifer Logan, 2009. "NAFTA or Nada? Trade's Impact on U.S. Border Retailers," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 260-286.
  4. Timothy C. Ford & Jonathan C. Rork & Bruce T. Elmslie, 2008. "Considering The Source: Does The Country Of Origin Of Fdi Matter To Economic Growth?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 329-357.
  5. Timothy C. Ford & Jonathan C. Rork & Bruce T. Elmslie, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment, Economic Growth, and the Human Capital Threshold: Evidence from US States," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 96-113, February.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Ford, Timothy C. & Rork, Jonathan C., 2010. "Why buy what you can get for free? The effect of foreign direct investment on state patent rates," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 72-81, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Rogers, Cynthia L. & Wu, Chen, 2012. "Employment by foreign firms in the U.S.: Do state incentives matter?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 664-680.
    2. Riccardo Crescenzi & Alexander Jaax, 2015. "Innovation in Russia: the territorial dimension," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1509, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Apr 2015.
    3. Paula Puskarova & Philipp Piribauer, 2014. "The impact of knowledge spillovers on regional total factor productivity. New empirical evidence from selected European countries," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1813, European Regional Science Association.

  2. Timothy C. Ford & Brian Logan & Jennifer Logan, 2009. "NAFTA or Nada? Trade's Impact on U.S. Border Retailers," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 260-286.

    Cited by:

    1. Ezcurra, Roberto & Rodriguez-Pose, Andres, 2013. "Trade openness and spatial inequality in emerging countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 9428, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Rodriguez-Pose, Andres, 2010. "Trade and regional inequality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5347, The World Bank.

  3. Timothy C. Ford & Jonathan C. Rork & Bruce T. Elmslie, 2008. "Considering The Source: Does The Country Of Origin Of Fdi Matter To Economic Growth?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(2), pages 329-357.

    Cited by:

    1. Markus Leibrecht & Aleksandra Riedl, 2012. "Modelling FDI based on a spatially augmented gravity model: Evidence for Central and Eastern European Countries," Working Paper Series in Economics 239, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    2. L. Pérez-Villar & A. Seric, 2015. "Multinationals in Sub-Saharan Africa: Domestic linkages and institutional distance," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 142, pages 94-117.
    3. Ines Kersan-Skabic & Lela Tijanic, 2014. "The Influence of Foreign Direct Investments on Regional Development in Croatia," Croatian Economic Survey, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb, vol. 16(2), pages 59-90, December.

  4. Timothy C. Ford & Jonathan C. Rork & Bruce T. Elmslie, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment, Economic Growth, and the Human Capital Threshold: Evidence from US States," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 96-113, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Ford, Timothy C. & Rork, Jonathan C., 2010. "Why buy what you can get for free? The effect of foreign direct investment on state patent rates," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 72-81, July.
    2. Rogers, Cynthia L. & Wu, Chen, 2012. "Employment by foreign firms in the U.S.: Do state incentives matter?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 664-680.
    3. Herzer, Dierk, 2015. "The long-run effect of foreign direct investment on total factor productivity in developing countries: A panel cointegration analysis," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112827, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Lee, Chi-Chuan & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2013. "The link between life insurance activities and economic growth: Some new evidence," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 405-427.
    5. Ines TROJETTE, 2016. "The Effect Of Foreign Direct Investment On Economic Growth: The Institutional Threshold," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 43, pages 111-138.
    6. Eckhardt Bode & Peter Nunnenkamp & Andreas Waldkirch, 2012. "Spatial effects of foreign direct investment in US states," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(1), pages 16-40, February.
    7. Rork, Jonathan C., 2005. "Getting What You Pay For: The Case of Southern Economic Development," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 35(2).
    8. Dube, Smile, 2009. "Foreign Direct Investment and Electricity Consumption on Economic Growth: Evidence from South Africa," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 62(2), pages 175-200.
    9. Shima'a Hanafy, 2015. "Sectoral FDI and Economic Growth — Evidence from Egyptian Governorates," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201537, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    10. Mohamed Abdouli & Sami Hammami, 2017. "The Impact of FDI Inflows and Environmental Quality on Economic Growth: an Empirical Study for the MENA Countries," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(1), pages 254-278, March.
    11. Donny Tang, 2015. "Has the European Financial Integration Promoted the Economic Growth Among the New European Union Countries?," Research in Economics and Business: Central and Eastern Europe, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology, vol. 7(1).
    12. Lee, Chi-Chuan & Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiou, Yan-Yu, 2017. "Insurance activities, globalization, and economic growth: New methods, new evidence," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 155-170.

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