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Sample attrition in the RLMS, 2001–10

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  • Christopher J. Gerry
  • Georgios Papadopoulos

Abstract

type="main" xml:id="ecot12063-abs-0001"> The data of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS) – Higher School of Economics represents one of the few nationally representative sources of household and individual data for Russia. These data have been collected since 1992 and in recent years, thanks to more secure financial and logistical support, have become a resource increasingly drawn upon by scholars and students for national and cross-national studies. In this paper, we examine the extent of non-random attrition in the RLMS and discuss the circumstances under which this might give rise to biases in econometric analysis. We illustrate this with an example drawn from the health sphere.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher J. Gerry & Georgios Papadopoulos, 2015. "Sample attrition in the RLMS, 2001–10," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 425-468, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:23:y:2015:i:2:p:425-468
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    Cited by:

    1. Valerii Baidin & Christopher J. Gerry & Maria Kaneva, 2021. "How Self-Rated is Self-Rated Health? Exploring the Role of Individual and Institutional Factors in Reporting Heterogeneity in Russia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 155(2), pages 675-696, June.
    2. Quirmbach, Diana & Gerry, Christopher J., 2016. "Gender, education and Russia’s tobacco epidemic: A life-course approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 54-66.
    3. Kaneva, Maria & Baidin, Valerii, 2018. "Heterogeneity in reporting self-assessed health of the Russians," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 51, pages 102-125.
    4. Piccoli, Luca & Tiezzi, Silvia, 2020. "Rational Addiction and Time Consistency: An Empirical Test," IZA Discussion Papers 12906, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Polina Kozyreva & Klara Sabirianova Peter, 2015. "Economic change in Russia: Twenty years of the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 293-298, April.
    6. Hai-Anh H. Dang & Michael M. Lokshin & Kseniya Abanokova, 2019. "Did the Poor Adapt to Their Circumstances? Evidence from Long-run Russian Panel Data," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(4), pages 2258-2274.
    7. Andrey Aistov & Ekaterina Aleksandrova & Christopher J. Gerry, 2021. "Voluntary private health insurance, health-related behaviours and health outcomes: evidence from Russia," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 22(2), pages 281-309, March.
    8. Bryukhanov, Maksym & Fedotenkov, Igor, 2017. "Religiosity and life satisfaction in Russia: Evidence from the Russian data," MPRA Paper 82750, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Paul, Pavitra & Valtonen, Hannu, 2015. "Health inequality in the Russian Federation: An examination of the changes in concentration and achievement indices from 1994 to 2013," MPRA Paper 70150, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Feb 2016.
    10. Christopher M. Davis & Ekaterina M. Pazukhina, 2019. "Financial, Career and Professional Aspects of the Motivation of the New Generation of Doctors in Russia," Finansovyj žhurnal — Financial Journal, Financial Research Institute, Moscow 127006, Russia, issue 1, pages 110-132, February.

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