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Heterogeneity in reporting self-assessed health of the Russians

Author

Listed:
  • Kaneva, Maria

    (Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, Moscow, Russian Federation)

  • Baidin, Valerii

    (Financial research institute of the Ministry of finance of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russian Federation)

Abstract

The article aims to analyze a phenomenon of heterogeneity in self-assessed health for the Russian population from 2001 to 2015, to determine types of heterogeneity and to elicit socio-economic and health-rated determinants of heterogeneity. A generalized ordered probit model with random effects and objective diseases index indicated that the determinants of heterogeneity in the Russian Federation are for both genders: marital status, income, incomplete secondary education, living outside urban areas and region of settlement; age also affects the differences in self-reported health for women. Secondary education is also a driver of observed heterogeneity for women while different regions drive cut-point shift heterogeneity for males and females. The study confirms that direct comparison of self-assessed health for different population groups will lead to incorrect conclusions.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaneva, Maria & Baidin, Valerii, 2018. "Heterogeneity in reporting self-assessed health of the Russians," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 51, pages 102-125.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0351
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Valerii Baidin & Christopher J. Gerry & Maria Kaneva, 2021. "How Self-Rated is Self-Rated Health? Exploring the Role of Individual and Institutional Factors in Reporting Heterogeneity in Russia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 155(2), pages 675-696, June.
    2. Raskina, Yulia & Podkorytova, Olga & Kuchakov, Ruslan, 2022. "Health determinants and the reporting heterogeneity bias in Russia: Anchoring vignettes approach," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 66, pages 118-143.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    heterogeneity; self-assessed health; panel regression; RLMS; Russia.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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