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Adjusting Self-Assessed Health for Potential Bias Using a Random-Effects Generalized Ordered Probit model

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  • Yang, Qingqing
  • Rosenman, Robert

Abstract

We study how socioeconomic conditions, especially relative household income, affect self-assessed health. We use a random effects generalized ordered probit model with data from China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) to test for heterogeneity in how people assess their health. The results show that individuals with high relative income are less likely to report poor health, but they are also less likely to report extremely good healthy. Although SAH capture many aspects of health elements, it might be biased on some socioeconomic features.

Suggested Citation

  • Yang, Qingqing & Rosenman, Robert, 2015. "Adjusting Self-Assessed Health for Potential Bias Using a Random-Effects Generalized Ordered Probit model," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205217, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea15:205217
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.205217
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/205217/files/AAEA%20discussion%20paper.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Christian Pfarr & Andreas Schmid & Udo Schneider, 2011. "Estimating ordered categorical variables using panel data: a generalized ordered probit model with an autofit procedure," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 54(1), pages 7-23.
    6. Lindeboom, Maarten & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2004. "Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1083-1099, November.
    7. Nicolas Gérard Vaillant & François-Charles Wolff, 2012. "On the reliability of self-reported health: Evidence from Albanian data," Working Papers hal-00694448, HAL.
    8. Udo Schneider & Christian Pfarr & Brit Schneider & Volker Ulrich, 2012. "I feel good! Gender differences and reporting heterogeneity in self-assessed health," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(3), pages 251-265, June.
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    Keywords

    Health Economics and Policy; Institutional and Behavioral Economics; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

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