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The dynamics of health and its determinants among the elderly in developing countries

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  • Kim, Younoh

Abstract

This paper examines the persistence of bad health among the elderly, and attempts to identify its determinants. We are particularly interested in the role of recent past bad health. Using a panel data set from Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS), several health measures such as poor general health status (poor GHS), hypertension, and low body mass index (low BMI) are examined. We find that for all health measures, recent past bad health has a small impact on current bad health once conditioning on individual fixed effects. For instance, in the case of poor GHS, the elderly with poor GHS in the recent past are only 4% points more likely to have poor GHS in the subsequent period compared to their counterparts.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Younoh, 2015. "The dynamics of health and its determinants among the elderly in developing countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 1-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:19:y:2015:i:c:p:1-12
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2015.06.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Younoh & Knowles, Scott & Manley, James & Radoias, Vlad, 2017. "Long-run health consequences of air pollution: Evidence from Indonesia's forest fires of 1997," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 186-198.
    2. repec:ris:apltrx:0351 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:30:y:2018:i:c:p:130-149 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Elderly; Body mass index; General health status; Hypertension; Dynamic conditional health function; Indonesia;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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