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Long-Run Health Consequences of Air Pollution: Evidence from Indonesia's Forest Fires of 1997

Author

Listed:
  • Younoh Kim

    () (Department of Economics, Eastern Michigan University)

  • Scott Knowles

    ()

  • James Manley

    () (Department of Economics, Towson University)

  • Vlad Radoias

    () (Department of Economics, Towson University)

Abstract

While many studies in the medical literature documented causal relationships between air pollution and negative health outcomes immediately following exposure, much less is known about the long run health consequences of pollution exposure. Using the 1997 Indonesian forest fires as a natural experiment, we estimate the long term effects of air pollution on health outcomes. We take advantage of the longitudinal nature of the Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS), which collects detailed individual data on a multitude of health outcomes, in both 1997 and 2007. We find significant negative effects of pollution, which persist in the long run. Men and the elderly are impacted the most, while children seem to recover almost completely from these early shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Younoh Kim & Scott Knowles & James Manley & Vlad Radoias, 2016. "Long-Run Health Consequences of Air Pollution: Evidence from Indonesia's Forest Fires of 1997," Working Papers 2016-11, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised May 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:tow:wpaper:2016-11
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Younoh Kim & James Manley & Vlad Radoias, 2017. "Medium- and Long-run Consequences of Pollution on Labor Supply: Evidence from Indonesia's Forest Fires of 1997," Working Papers 2017-02, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2017.
    2. Younoh Kim & James Manley & Vlad Radoias, 2017. "Medium- and long-term consequences of pollution on labor supply: evidence from Indonesia," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-15, December.
    3. Vítor João Pereira Domingues Martinho, 2019. "Socioeconomic Impacts of Forest Fires upon Portugal: An Analysis for the Agricultural and Forestry Sectors," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(2), pages 1-14, January.
    4. Hatton, Timothy J. & Sparrow, Robert & Suryadarma, Daniel & van der Eng, Pierre, 2018. "Fertility and the health of children in Indonesia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 67-78.
    5. Li, Zhengtao & Hu, Bin, 2018. "Perceived health risk, environmental knowledge, and contingent valuation for improving air quality: New evidence from the Jinchuan mining area in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 54-68.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Air Pollution; Health; Indonesia.;

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

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