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The nature and causes of attrition in the British Household Panel Study


  • Uhrig, S.C. Noah


Panel attrition is a process producing data absent from panel records due to survey non-participation or other data unavailability. I examine the nature and causes of attrition resulting from non-contact and survey refusal in the British Household Panel Study. Focusing on non-response transitions amongst Wave 1 respondents using discrete time transition models, I locate attrition at first non-response over the first 14 waves. Physical impediments to contact, less time spent at home and high likelihood of geographic mobility are predictive of subsequent non-contact. Refusals most often result from lack of interest in the survey and general low motivation to participate.

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  • Uhrig, S.C. Noah, 2008. "The nature and causes of attrition in the British Household Panel Study," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2008-05

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    1. Pamela Campanelli & Colm O'Muircheartaigh, 1999. "Interviewers, Interviewer Continuity, and Panel Survey Nonresponse," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 59-76, February.
    2. John Fitzgerald & Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1998. "An Analysis of Sample Attrition in Panel Data: The Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 251-299.
    3. Lynn, Peter & Buck, Nick & Burton, Jonathan & Jäckle, Annette & Laurie, Heather, 2005. "A review of methodological research pertinent to longitudinal survey design and data collection," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-29, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Frauke Kreuter & Richard Valliant, 2007. "A survey on survey statistics: What is done and can be done in Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(1), pages 1-21, February.
    5. Denise Hawkes & Ian Plewis, 2006. "Modelling non-response in the National Child Development Study," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(3), pages 479-491.
    6. Elizabeth Martin, 2007. "Strength of attachment: Survey coverage of people with tenuous ties to residences," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(2), pages 427-440, May.
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