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Population Ageing and Social Security in Asia

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  • Rafal Chomik
  • John Piggott

Abstract

type="main"> Asian countries are at different stages of demographic transition. While Central and South Asian countries are relatively young and will remain so for some time, East and Southeast Asia are expected to age at an unprecedented rate in the next few decades. Japan has reached the future first. Other nations, such as China, are still young but ageing faster than many advanced economies, including Australia and the USA. This demographic shift has considerable implications for the development of social policy. Here too, countries differ widely. This paper sets the context for the rest of the volume. The focus is mostly on countries in East and Southeast Asia, but it includes contrasting comparisons to key regional countries such as India and Australia. First, the paper presents the context: the demographic, urbanization, and social trends facing Asia. Second, it tackles the allocation of resources for the elderly, in particular, by summarizing approaches to two areas of social policy most pertinent to population ageing: retirement income and health care.

Suggested Citation

  • Rafal Chomik & John Piggott, 2015. "Population Ageing and Social Security in Asia," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 10(2), pages 199-222, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiapr:v:10:y:2015:i:2:p:199-222
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/aepr.12098
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:blg:reveco:v:69:y:2017:i:5:p:22-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:joecag:v:8:y:2016:i:c:p:5-18 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hal Hill, 2015. "Comment on “Population Ageing and Social Security in Asia”," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 10(2), pages 223-224, July.
    4. Takatoshi Ito & Kazumasa Iwata & Colin McKenzie & Shujiro Urata, 2015. "Social Security in Ageing Asia: Editors' Overview," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 10(2), pages 179-198, July.
    5. repec:sek:jijoes:v:6:y:2017:i:2:p:82-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Marcus Noland, 2015. "Comment on “Public Pension Programs in Southeast Asia: An Assessment”," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 10(2), pages 246-247, July.

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