IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/era/wpaper/dp-2011-04.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Why Does Population Aging Matter So Much for Asia? Population Aging, Economic Security and Economic Growth in Asia

Author

Listed:
  • Sang-Hyop LEE

    (Sang-Hyop LEE East West Center and University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA)

  • Andrew MASON

    (Andrew MASON East West Center and University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA)

  • Donghyun PARK

    (Donghyun PARK Economics and Research Department, Asian Development Bank, Philippines)

Abstract

Asia as a whole is experiencing a rapid demographic transition toward older population structures. Within this broader region-wide trend, there is considerable heterogeneity, with different countries at different stages of the demographic transition. In this paper, we document Asia’s population aging, describe the region’s old-age support systems, and draw out the regional socioeconomic implications of population aging and old-age support systems. Population aging gives rise to two fundamental challenges for the region – (1) developing socioeconomic systems that can provide economic security to the growing number of elderly and (2) sustaining strong growth in the face of aging over the next few decades. Successfully addressing those two challenges will be vital for ensuring Asia’s continued economic success in the medium and long term.

Suggested Citation

  • Sang-Hyop LEE & Andrew MASON & Donghyun PARK, 2011. "Why Does Population Aging Matter So Much for Asia? Population Aging, Economic Security and Economic Growth in Asia," Working Papers DP-2011-04, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
  • Handle: RePEc:era:wpaper:dp-2011-04
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.eria.org/ERIA-DP-2011-04.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Pia N. Malaney, 1999. "Demographic Change and Economic Growth in Asia," CID Working Papers 15, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Lee, Ronald & Mason, Andrew & Miller, Timothy, 2000. "From Transfers to Individual Responsibility: Implications for Savings and Capital Accumulation in Taiwan and the United States," Arbetsrapport 2000:3, Institute for Futures Studies.
    3. Andrew Mason & Ronald Lee & An-Chi Tung & Mun-Sim Lai & Tim Miller, 2009. "Population Aging and Intergenerational Transfers: Introducing Age into National Accounts," NBER Chapters,in: Developments in the Economics of Aging, pages 89-122 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Andrew Mason & Ronald Lee & Sang-Hyop Lee, 2010. "The Demographic Transition and Economic Growth in the Pacific Rim," NBER Chapters,in: The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 19, pages 19-55 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Takatoshi Ito & Andrew Rose, 2010. "The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 19," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number ito_08-2.
    6. Dirk Krueger & Felix Kubler, 2002. "Intergenerational Risk-Sharing via Social Security when Financial Markets Are Incomplete," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 407-410.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Renuga Nagarajan & Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Sandra T. Silva, 2013. "The impact of an ageing population on economic growth: an exploratory review of the main mechanisms," FEP Working Papers 504, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    2. Renuga Nagarajan & Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Sandra T. Silva, 2013. "The impact of population ageing on economic growth: an in-depth bibliometric analysis," FEP Working Papers 505, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    3. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1424-0 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:era:wpaper:dp-2011-04. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Hiroshi Okasaki). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eriadid.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.