IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jscscx/v4y2015i4p940-966d56746.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Population Aging: An Emerging Research Agenda for Sustainable Development

Author

Listed:
  • Shogo Kudo

    () (Graduate Program in Sustainability Science—Global Leadership Initiative (GPSS-GLI), Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8563, Japan)

  • Emmanuel Mutisya

    () (Graduate Program in Sustainability Science—Global Leadership Initiative (GPSS-GLI), Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8563, Japan)

  • Masafumi Nagao

    () (United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, 5-53-70 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8925, Japan)

Abstract

In recent years, population aging has been recognized as an emerging challenge in many parts of the world. Earlier studies discussed its impacts on the sustainability of social security systems and national economic growth; however, they tended to focus on the issues at the national level and were limited to developed countries. With the knowledge that population aging will be a predominant trend in both developed and developing countries, this paper aims to: (i) describe the global population aging trend and its regional demography; (ii) provide a structural review of population aging challenges at the national, communal and individual levels; and (iii) elaborate future research topics on population aging with a particular emphasis on developing countries. Several indicators suggest rapid population aging in the coming decades, especially in Asia, Latin America and Africa. The structural review presents the diverse challenges that affect both young and older population groups. Finally, the need for linking population aging with the sustainable development concept and the possible rural decline caused by rapid urbanization are suggested as future research topics. Further studies to establish a body of knowledge on population aging in developing countries are required to place population aging on the agenda of future sustainable development discussions.

Suggested Citation

  • Shogo Kudo & Emmanuel Mutisya & Masafumi Nagao, 2015. "Population Aging: An Emerging Research Agenda for Sustainable Development," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-27, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jscscx:v:4:y:2015:i:4:p:940-966:d:56746
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/4/4/940/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/4/4/940/
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Günther Fink, 2010. "Implications of population ageing for economic growth," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 583-612, Winter.
    2. Bloom, David E. & Börsch-Supan, Axel & McGee, Patrick & Seike, Atsushi, 1970. "Population Aging: Facts, Challenges, and Responses," MEA discussion paper series 201224, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    3. Sarah Harper, 2014. "Migration and ageing societies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy, chapter 5, pages 46-58 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Andreas Werblow & Stefan Felder & Peter Zweifel, 2007. "Population ageing and health care expenditure: a school of 'red herrings'?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(10), pages 1109-1126.
    5. Philip Lowe & Neil Ward, 2009. "England's Rural Futures: A Socio-Geographical Approach to Scenarios Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(10), pages 1319-1332, December.
    6. John Bongaarts, 2004. "Population Aging and the Rising Cost of Public Pensions," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(1), pages 1-23.
    7. Bill Hopwood & Mary Mellor & Geoff O'Brien, 2005. "Sustainable development: mapping different approaches," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(1), pages 38-52.
    8. Amanda Whelan & Neil Wrigley & Daniel Warm & Elizabeth Cannings, 2002. "Life in a 'Food Desert'," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(11), pages 2083-2100, October.
    9. F. Landis MacKellar, 2000. "The Predicament of Population Aging: A Review Essay," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(2), pages 365-404.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    population aging; sustainable development; rural decline; community function;

    JEL classification:

    • A - General Economics and Teaching
    • B - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology
    • N - Economic History
    • P - Economic Systems
    • Y80 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Related Disciplines - - - Related Disciplines
    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jscscx:v:4:y:2015:i:4:p:940-966:d:56746. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: https://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.