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Population Aging: Facts, Challenges, and Responses

Author

Listed:
  • David E. Bloom

    () (Harvard School of Public Health)

  • Axel Boersch-Supan

    () (Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging)

  • Patrick McGee
  • Atsushi Seike

Abstract

The world’s population is growing older, leading us into uncharted demographic waters. There will be higher absolute numbers of elderly people, a larger share of elderly, longer healthy life expectancies, and relatively fewer numbers of working-age people. There are alarmist views – both popular and serious – in circulation regarding what these changes might mean for business and economic performance. But the effects of population aging are not straightforward to predict. Population aging does raise some formidable and fundamentally new challenges, but they are not insurmountable. These changes also bring some new opportunities, because people have longer, healthier lives, resulting in extended working years, and different capacities and needs. The key is adaptation on all levels: individual, organizational, and societal. This article explores some potentially useful responses from government and business to the challenges posed by aging.

Suggested Citation

  • David E. Bloom & Axel Boersch-Supan & Patrick McGee & Atsushi Seike, 2011. "Population Aging: Facts, Challenges, and Responses," PGDA Working Papers 7111, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  • Handle: RePEc:gdm:wpaper:7111
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    File URL: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/pgda/WorkingPapers/2011/PGDA_WP_71.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Günther Fink, 2010. "Implications of population ageing for economic growth," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 583-612, Winter.
    2. John B. Shoven, 2010. "Demography and the Economy," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number shov08-1, April.
    3. Axel BÖRSCH-SUPAN & Alexander LUDWIG, 2009. "Aging, Asset Markets, and Asset Returns: A View From Europe to Asia," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 4(1), pages 69-92.
    4. James M. Poterba, 2004. "The impact of population aging on financial markets," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Aug, pages 163-216.
    5. David Bloom & David Canning & Günther Fink & Jocelyn Finlay, 2009. "Fertility, female labor force participation, and the demographic dividend," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 79-101, June.
    6. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Introduction to "Social Security and Retirement around the World"," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security and Retirement around the World, pages 1-35 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kyureghian, Gayaneh & Soler, Louis-Georges, 2016. "Life Cycle Consumption of Food: Evidence from French Data," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236785, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Renuga Nagarajan & Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Sandra T. Silva, 2013. "The impact of population ageing on economic growth: an in-depth bibliometric analysis," FEP Working Papers 505, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    3. van Dalen, H.P. & Henkens, K., 2015. "Why Demotion of Older Workers is a No-Go Area for Managers," Discussion Paper 2015-025, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    4. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_119 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sarah Harper, 2014. "Introduction: conceptualizing social policy for the twenty-first-century demography," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Ageing and Public Policy, chapter 1, pages 1-10 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. repec:bla:ausecp:v:56:y:2017:i:1:p:72-94 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Abidi, Hella & Klumpp, Matthias, 2014. "Demografischer Wandel und Industrie-Qualifikationsrahmen Logistik," ild Schriftenreihe Logistikforschung 40, FOM Hochschule, Institut für Logistik- & Dienstleistungsmanagement (ild).
    8. Zaiceva, A. & Zimmermann, K.F., 2016. "Migration and the Demographic Shift," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, Elsevier.
    9. Shogo Kudo & Emmanuel Mutisya & Masafumi Nagao, 2015. "Population Aging: An Emerging Research Agenda for Sustainable Development," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-27, October.
    10. Mao, Hong & Ostaszewski, Krzysztof M. & Wang, Yuling, 2014. "Optimal retirement age, leisure and consumption," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 458-464.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    population; aging; longevity; fertility;

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