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Aging, Economic Growth, and Old-Age Security in Asia

Editor

Listed:
  • Donghyun Park
  • Sang-Hyop Lee
  • Andrew Mason

Abstract

First, the expert contributors argue, Asia must find ways to sustain rapid economic growth in the face of less favorable demographics, which implies slower growth of the workforce. Second, they contend, Asia must find ways to deliver affordable, adequate, and sustainable old-age economic security for its growing elderly population. Underpinned by rigorous analysis, a wide range of concrete policy options for sustaining economic growth while delivering economic security for the elderly are then presented. These include Asia-wide policy options – relevant to the entire region – such as building up strong national pension systems, while other policy options are more relevant to sub-groups of countries.

Individual chapters are listed in the "Chapters" tab

Suggested Citation

  • Donghyun Park & Sang-Hyop Lee & Andrew Mason (ed.), 2012. "Aging, Economic Growth, and Old-Age Security in Asia," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15088.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:15088
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ermisch, John & Ogawa, Naohiro, 1994. "Age at Motherhood in Japan," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 7(4), pages 393-420, November.
    2. Rob Clark & Rikiya Matsukura & Naohiro Ogawa, 2013. "Low fertility, human capital, and economic growth," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(32), pages 865-884.
    3. Rikiya Matsukura & Naohiro Ogawa & Robert Clark, 2007. "Analysis of Employment Patterns and the Changing Demographic Structure of Japan," Japanese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 82-153.
    4. Ogawa, Naohiro & Ermisch, John F, 1996. "Family Structure, Home Time Demands, and the Employment Patterns of Japanese Married Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 677-702, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Hyun-Hoon & Shin, Kwanho, 2019. "Nonlinear effects of population aging on economic growth," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 1-1.
    2. Joonkyung Ha & Sang-Hyop Lee, 2018. "Population Aging and the Possibility of a Middle-Income Trap in Asia," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(6), pages 1225-1238, May.
    3. Holzmann, Robert, 2014. "Old-age financial protection in Malaysia : challenges and options," Social Protection Discussion Papers and Notes 92725, The World Bank.
    4. Ramiro Albrieu & Jose Maria Fanelli, 2018. "Fiscal Redistribution, Sustainability, and Demography in Latin America," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 80, Tulane University, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2019.
    5. Rob Clark & Rikiya Matsukura & Naohiro Ogawa, 2013. "Low fertility, human capital, and economic growth," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(32), pages 865-884.

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