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Family Structure, Home Time Demands, and the Employment Patterns of Japanese Married Women

Listed author(s):
  • Ogawa, Naohiro
  • Ermisch, John F

A recent (1990) national survey is used in an econometric analysis of Japanese women's hourly pay and employment patterns. It confirms many results from Western industrial countries but also indicates the important influence of Japan's unique family structure, the persistence of multigenerational households, on married women's employment patterns. Younger married women are more likely to take paid employment in such households, particularly on a full-time basis, than in nuclear family households. This appears to reflect in part the child-care role played by the women's parents or parents-in-law. Copyright 1996 by University of Chicago Press.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/209827
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 14 (1996)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 677-702

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:14:y:1996:i:4:p:677-702
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  1. Lung-Fei Lee, 1982. "Some Approaches to the Correction of Selectivity Bias," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(3), pages 355-372.
  2. Blundell, Richard & Walker, Ian, 1984. "A Household Production Specification of Demographic Variables in Demand Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(376a), pages 59-68, Supplemen.
  3. Hill, M Anne, 1983. "Female Labor Force Participation in Developing and Developed Countries-Consideration of the Informal Sector," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 459-468, August.
  4. Nakamura, Alice & Nakamura, Masao, 1985. "On the performance of tests by Wu and by Hausman for detecting the ordinary least squares bias problem," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 213-227, September.
  5. John F. Ermisch & Robert E. Wright, 1993. "Wage Offers and Full-Time and Part-Time Employment by British Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 111-133.
  6. Tadashi Yamada & Tetsuji Yamada & Frank Chaloupka, 1987. "Using Aggregate Data to Estimate the Part-Time and Full-Time Work Behavior of Japanese Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(4), pages 574-583.
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