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Effects of Husband’s Education and Family Structure on Labor Force Participation and Married Japanese Women’s Earnings

  • Mano, Yukichi
  • Yamamura, Eiji

This paper investigates the effects of a husband’s education, family structure, co-residence with parents or in-laws, and childcare, on labor supply and earnings among married Japanese women between 2000 and 2002. Whereas educated husbands reduce the labor supply of wives, they tend to improve productivity and earnings of the wives once they participate in the labor market. Moreover, our analysis provides evidence of specific division of labor within a household, through which a wife’s mother or mother-in-law helps her participate in the labor market, while her father or father-in-law does not affect her labor participation. ( 95 words)

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 23957.

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Date of creation: 10 Jun 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:23957
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  1. David Lam & Robert F. Schoeni, 1994. "Family Ties and Labor Markets in the United States and Brazil," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(4), pages 1235-1258.
  2. Tadashi Yamada & Tetsuji Yamada & Frank Chaloupka, 1987. "Using Aggregate Data to Estimate the Part-Time and Full-Time Work Behavior of Japanese Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 22(4), pages 574-583.
  3. Ribar, D.C., 1990. "Child Care And The Labor Supply Of Married Women: Reducted Form Evidence," Papers 9-90-9, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  4. Lars Lefgren & Frank McIntyre, 2006. "The Relationship between Women's Education and Marriage Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 787-830, October.
  5. Angrist, Joshua D & Evans, William N, 1998. "Children and Their Parents' Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 450-77, June.
  6. Hill, M Anne, 1983. "Female Labor Force Participation in Developing and Developed Countries-Consideration of the Informal Sector," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 459-68, August.
  7. Shimada, Haruo & Higuchi, Yoshio, 1985. "An Analysis of Trends in Female Labor Force Participation in Japan," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages S355-74, January.
  8. Chong Huang & Hongbin Li & Pak Wai Liu & Junsen Zhang, 2009. "Why Does Spousal Education Matter for Earnings? Assortative Mating and Cross-Productivity," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(4), pages 633-652, October.
  9. Lam, David & Schoeni, Robert F, 1993. "Effects of Family Background on Earnings and Returns to Schooling: Evidence from Brazil," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(4), pages 710-40, August.
  10. Richard Blundell & Thomas MaCurdy, 1998. "Labour supply: a review of alternative approaches," IFS Working Papers W98/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  11. Kenny, Lawrence W, 1983. "The Accumulation of Human Capital during Marriage by Males," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(2), pages 223-31, April.
  12. Masaru Sasaki, 2002. "The Causal Effect of Family Structure on Labor Force Participation among Japanese Married Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(2), pages 429-440.
  13. Ribar, D.C., 1991. "A Structural Model of Child Care and the Labor Supply of Married Women," Papers 1-91-1, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  14. Paul J. Devereux, 2004. "Changes in Relative Wages and Family Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
  15. Tiefenthaler, Jill, 1997. "The Productivity Gains of Marriage: Effects of Spousal Education on Own Productivity across Market Sectors in Brazil," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(3), pages 633-50, April.
  16. Shahina Amin & Lisa K. Jepsen, 2005. "The Impact of a Wife's Education on Her Husband's Earnings in Malaysia," The Journal of Economics, Missouri Valley Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 1-18.
  17. Neuman, Shoshana & Ziderman, Adrian, 1992. "Benefits of Women's Education within Marriage: Results for Israel in a Dual Labor Market Context," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(2), pages 413-24, January.
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