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Socio-economic status, gender, and spouse’s earnings: affect of family background on matching

Author

Listed:
  • Yamamura, Eiji

Abstract

This paper uses individual level data (the Japanese General Social Surveys 2000-2003) to examine how socio-economic status influences own and spouse’s earnings. After controlling for own and spouse’s characteristics such as human capital and age, I found: (1) childhood economic condition considered as socio-economic status is not associated with own income for both males and females. (2) The better a female’s childhood economic condition was, the higher her husband’s income. On the other hand, a male’s childhood economic condition was not related to his wife’s income. This suggests that social stratification persists through marriage for females but not for males.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamamura, Eiji, 2009. "Socio-economic status, gender, and spouse’s earnings: affect of family background on matching," MPRA Paper 17100, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17100
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17100/1/MPRA_paper_17100.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Status; identity of genders; spouse’s income; marriage market;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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