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The Influence of College Tuition and Fees on Fertility Rate in Taiwan

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  • Jr-Tsung Huang

    ()

  • An-Pang Kao

    ()

  • Wen-Chuan Hung

Abstract

This study investigates the influence of college tuition and fees (CTF) on fertility behavior as a mechanism to induce population growth. Using a fixed-effect regression model with various specifications of the fertility equation on contiguous panel data for the period 1990–2001, this study has determined of that CTF has a significantly negative influence on regional GFR (general fertility rate) in Taiwan. In addition, unemployment rates also have a negative impact on fertility though the male rate plays a greater role in the fertility decision than the female rate. Finally, this study calculates the cost in terms of CTF to the Central Government to induce population growth. For a 1% decrease in real CTF, the cost to the government and taxpayers at large, the cost of each additional child will range from US$90.31 to US$252.23 depending on the years considered and the model specifications. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Jr-Tsung Huang & An-Pang Kao & Wen-Chuan Hung, 2006. "The Influence of College Tuition and Fees on Fertility Rate in Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 626-642, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:27:y:2006:i:4:p:626-642
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-006-9037-4
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-006-9037-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Schultz, T. Paul, 1988. "Population programs: Measuring their impact on fertility and the personal distribution of their effects," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 113-139, April.
    2. Mocan, Naci H, 1990. "Business Cycles and Fertility Dynamics in the United States: A Vector Autoregressive Model," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 3(2), pages 125-146, August.
    3. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    4. Schultz, T Paul, 1973. "A Preliminary Survey of Economic Analyses of Fertility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(2), pages 71-78, May.
    5. Whittington, Leslie A & Alm, James & Peters, H Elizabeth, 1990. "Fertility and the Personal Exemption: Implicit Pronatalist Policy in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(3), pages 545-556, June.
    6. Cheng, Benjamin S. & Nwachukwu, Savior L. S., 1997. "The effect of education on fertility in Taiwan: A time series analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 95-99, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Manouchehr Mokhtari & Nader Asgary, 2009. "Effects of Consumer Goods Shortages on Fertility in Post-Soviet Economy," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 160-170, June.
    2. Kuang-Ta Lo, 2012. "The Crowding-out Effect of Homeownership on Fertility," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 108-117, March.
    3. George Hondroyiannis, 2010. "Fertility Determinants and Economic Uncertainty: An Assessment Using European Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 33-50, March.
    4. Tsung Huang & Tsun-Feng Chiang & Jiun-Nan Pan, 2015. "Fertility and Crime: Evidence from Spatial Analysis of Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 319-327, September.

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