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Population Aging, Intergenerational Transfers and the Macroeconomy

Editor

Listed:
  • Robert L. Clark
  • Naohiro Ogawa
  • Andrew Mason

Abstract

Population aging is a global phenomenon that influences not only the industrialized countries of Asia and the West, but also many middle- and low- income countries that have experienced rapid fertility decline and achieved long life expectancies. This book explores how workers and consumers are responding to population aging and examines how economic growth, generational equity, trade and international capital flows are influenced by population aging.

Individual chapters are listed in the "Related works & more" tab

Suggested Citation

  • Robert L. Clark & Naohiro Ogawa & Andrew Mason (ed.), 2007. "Population Aging, Intergenerational Transfers and the Macroeconomy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 12608, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:12608
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781847200990.xml
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Mason & Ronald Lee, 2011. "Population aging and the generational economy: key findings," Chapters, in: Ronald Lee & Andrew Mason (ed.), Population Aging and the Generational Economy, chapter 1, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Sang-Hyop Lee & Andrew Mason & Donghyun Park, 2012. "Overview: why does population aging matter so much for Asia? Population aging, economic growth, and economic security in Asia," Chapters, in: Donghyun Park & Sang-Hyop Lee & Andrew Mason (ed.), Aging, Economic Growth, and Old-Age Security in Asia, chapter 1, pages 1-31, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Ronald Lee & Andrew Mason, 2011. "Lifecycles, support systems, and generational flows: patterns and change," Chapters, in: Ronald Lee & Andrew Mason (ed.), Population Aging and the Generational Economy, chapter 4, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Takatoshi Ito & Andrew Rose, 2010. "Introduction to "The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia"," NBER Chapters, in: The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia, pages 1-15, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2013. "Demographic Dividends Revisited," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 30(2), pages 1-25, September.
    6. Haroon Bhorat & Karmen Naidoo & Morné Oosthuizen & Kavisha Pillay, 2015. "Demographic, employment, and wage trends in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 141, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Williamson, Jeffrey G, 2013. "Demographic Dividends Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 9390, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Andrew Mason & Sang-Hyop Lee, 2012. "Population, wealth, and economicgrowth in Asia and the Pacific," Chapters, in: Donghyun Park & Sang-Hyop Lee & Andrew Mason (ed.), Aging, Economic Growth, and Old-Age Security in Asia, chapter 2, pages 32-82, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Ronald Lee & Andrew Mason, 2011. "Theorectical aspects of National Transfer Accounts," Chapters, in: Ronald Lee & Andrew Mason (ed.), Population Aging and the Generational Economy, chapter 2, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Andy Mason & Sang-Hyop Lee & Ronald Lee, 2010. "Will Demographic Change Undermine Asia’s Growth Prospects?," Chapters, in: Masahiro Kawai & Jong-Wha Lee & Peter A. Petri & Giovanni Capanelli (ed.), Asian Regionalism in the World Economy, chapter 3, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. David E. Bloom & Jocelyn Finlay & Salal Humair & Andrew Mason & Olanrewaju Olaniyan & Adedoyin Soyibo, 2016. "Prospects for Economic Growth in Nigeria: A Demographic Perspective," PGDA Working Papers 12715, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.

    More about this item

    Book Chapters

    The following chapters of this book are listed in IDEAS

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance; Politics and Public Policy Social Policy and Sociology;

    JEL classification:

    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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