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Will Demographic Change Undermine Asia’s Growth Prospects?

In: Asian Regionalism in the World Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Andy Mason
  • Sang-Hyop Lee
  • Ronald Lee

Abstract

The structure and policy architecture of the world economy, as it emerges from the historic challenges now underway, will be affected by the dramatic rise of Asian economies and deepening connections among them. This important book examines the rapid transformation of the Asian economy, the challenges it faces, emerging regional solutions, and how Asia can play a more constructive role in the global economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Andy Mason & Sang-Hyop Lee & Ronald Lee, 2010. "Will Demographic Change Undermine Asia’s Growth Prospects?," Chapters, in: Masahiro Kawai & Jong-Wha Lee & Peter A. Petri & Giovanni Capanelli (ed.), Asian Regionalism in the World Economy, chapter 3, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13758_3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    4. Junichi Goto, 2007. "Ageing Society and the Choice of Japan: Migration, FDI and Trade Liberalization," Chapters, in: Koichi Hamada & Hiromi Kato (ed.), Ageing and the Labor Market in Japan, chapter 6, Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    8. Lucas, Robert E B & Stark, Oded, 1985. "Motivations to Remit: Evidence from Botswana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 901-918, October.
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    11. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Introduction to "Social Security and Retirement around the World"," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security and Retirement around the World, pages 1-35, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Robert M. Schmidt & Allen C. Kelley, 1996. "Saving, dependency and development," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(4), pages 365-386.
    13. Allen Kelley & Robert Schmidt, 1995. "Aggregate population and economic growth correlations: The role of the components of demographic change," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 32(4), pages 543-555, November.
    14. Attanasio Orazio P. & Kitao Sagiri & Violante Giovanni L., 2006. "Quantifying the Effects of the Demographic Transition in Developing Economies," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-44, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2013. "Demographic Dividends Revisited," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 30(2), pages 1-25, September.

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