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Fertility and mortality changes in an overlapping-generations model with realistic demography

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  • Lau, Sau-Him Paul

Abstract

Many overlapping-generations models assume only working and retirement stages and are “not capable of representing the most basic feature of the human economic life cycle: that it begins and ends with periods of dependency, separated by a long intermediate period of consuming less than is produced” (Bommier and Lee, 2003). To examine the economic consequences of fertility and mortality changes in a common framework, we incorporate realistic demographic features into a continuous-time overlapping-generations model with childhood, adulthood and retirement stages. Using parameter values appropriate for industrial countries (such as the USA), we find that a fertility increase and a mortality decline, while both causing a rise in the population growth rate, have opposite effects on capital accumulation. We also consider simultaneous fertility and mortality changes, and find that the effect on capital accumulation of a mortality change dominates that of a fertility change.

Suggested Citation

  • Lau, Sau-Him Paul, 2014. "Fertility and mortality changes in an overlapping-generations model with realistic demography," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 512-521.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:38:y:2014:i:c:p:512-521
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2014.01.028
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bellido, Héctor & Molina, José Alberto & Solaz, Anne & Stancanelli, Elena, 2016. "Do children of the first marriage deter divorce?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 15-31.
    2. Nick Parr & Ross Guest, 2014. "A method for socially evaluating the effects of long-run demographic paths on living standards," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(11), pages 275-318.
    3. Pascual-Saez, Marta & Cantarero-Prieto, David & Pires Manso, José R., 2020. "Does population ageing affect savings in Europe?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 291-306.
    4. Shihong Zeng & Xinwei Zhang & Xiaowei Wang & Guowang Zeng, 2019. "Population Aging, Household Savings and Asset Prices: A Study Based on Urban Commercial Housing Prices," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(11), pages 1-21, June.
    5. Tamotsu Nakamura, 2018. "Solow meets Stone–Geary: Technological progress and the demographic transition," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(4), pages 768-790, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mortality; Fertility; Overlapping generations; Realistic demography; Capital accumulation;

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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