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A method for socially evaluating the effects of long-run demographic paths on living standards

Author

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  • Nick Parr

    (Macquarie University)

  • Ross Guest

    (Griffith University)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Nick Parr & Ross Guest, 2014. "A method for socially evaluating the effects of long-run demographic paths on living standards," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(11), pages 275-318, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:31:y:2014:i:11
    as

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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol31/11/31-11.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Scarborough, Helen, 2011. "Intergenerational equity and the social discount rate," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 55(2), June.
    4. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467-467.
    5. Erich Striessnig & Wolfgang Lutz, 2014. "How does education change the relationship between fertility and age-dependency under environmental constraints? A long-term simulation exercise," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(16), pages 465-492, February.
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    7. Carl Schmertmann, 2012. "Stationary populations with below-replacement fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(14), pages 319-330, April.
    8. David N. Weil, 1999. "Population Growth, Dependency, and Consumption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 251-255, May.
    9. Tomáš Sobotka & Vegard Skirbekk & Dimiter Philipov, 2011. "Economic Recession and Fertility in the Developed World," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 37(2), pages 267-306, June.
    10. Jackie Li, 2013. "A Poisson common factor model for projecting mortality and life expectancy jointly for females and males," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(1), pages 111-126, March.
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    13. Peter Mcdonald, 2006. "Low Fertility and the State: The Efficacy of Policy," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 32(3), pages 485-510.
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    15. Auerbach, Alan J & Kotlikoff, Laurence J, 1992. " The Impact of the Demographic Transition on Capital Formation," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 94(2), pages 281-295.
    16. Martin L. Weitzman, 2007. "Subjective Expectations and Asset-Return Puzzles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(4), pages 1102-1130, September.
    17. Ng, Yew-Kwang, 1986. "Social criteria for evaluating population change: An alternative to the Blackorby-Donaldson criterion," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 375-381, April.
    18. Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz & Jože Sambt, 2014. "Economic support ratios and the demographic dividend in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(34), pages 963-1010, April.
    19. Miguel Sánchez-Romero, 2013. "The role of demography on per capita output growth and saving rates," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 1347-1377, October.
    20. Arthur, W Brian & McNicoll, Geoffrey, 1978. "Samuelson, Population and Intergenerational Transfers," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 19(1), pages 241-246, February.
    21. Anne Gauthier, 2007. "The impact of family policies on fertility in industrialized countries: a review of the literature," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 26(3), pages 323-346, June.
    22. Lau, Sau-Him Paul, 2014. "Fertility and mortality changes in an overlapping-generations model with realistic demography," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 512-521.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Australia; labor force; methodology; population aging; population economics; population policy; population projection; social evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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