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Age Structure, Intergenerational Transfers and Economic Growth : an Overview

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  • Ronald Lee

Abstract

[fre] nome. Lorsque l'on envisage les enfants comme membres du ménage, les effets de la répartition par âge paraissent moins importants. Dans tous les cas, une croissance démographique plus rapide abaisse le capital par travailleur et, donc, le revenu par tête ; il semble que cet effet de croissance domine les effets de la répartition par âge. [eng] Age structure, intergenerational transfers and economic growth : an overview. Ronald Lee. This paper offers an anahjtic synthesis and critique of recent literature exploring the role of age structure in models of steady state economic growth. Some studies overstate the benefits of rapid population growth by focusing on pension costs to the exclusion of child dependency ; others overestimate the costs because they treat children as autonomous decision makers. When children are viewed as house-hold members, the effects of age distribution appear smaller. In any case, more rapid population growth depresses capital per worker and therefore per capita incarne; this effect of growth appears to dominate the age distribution effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Ronald Lee, 1980. "Age Structure, Intergenerational Transfers and Economic Growth : an Overview," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 31(6), pages 1129-1156.
  • Handle: RePEc:prs:reveco:reco_0035-2764_1980_num_31_6_408572
    Note: DOI:10.3406/reco.1980.408572
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    Cited by:

    1. Hippolyte d’ALBIS & Dalal MOOSA, 2015. "Generational Economics and the National Transfer Accounts," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 81(4), pages 409-441, December.
    2. Quamrul H. Ashraf & David N. Weil & Joshua Wilde, 2013. "The Effect of Fertility Reduction on Economic Growth," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 39(1), pages 97-130, March.
    3. Jorge Tovar & B. Urdinola, 2014. "Inequality in National Inter-Generational Transfers: Evidence from Colombia," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 20(2), pages 167-187, May.
    4. d'Albis, Hippolyte, 2007. "Demographic structure and capital accumulation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 132(1), pages 411-434, January.
    5. Hippolyte d’Albis & Carole Bonnet & Julien Navaux, 2016. "When in life is income higher than consumption? Changes in France over 30 years," Population et Sociétés 529, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    6. Antoine Bommier & Ronald D. Lee, 2003. "Overlapping generations models with realistic demography," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(1), pages 135-160, February.
    7. D'ALBIS Hippolyte & AUGERAUD-VÉRON Emmanuelle, 2009. "Continuous-Time Overlapping Generations Models," LERNA Working Papers 09.15.291, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    8. Theodore C. Bergstrom, 1996. "Economics in a Family Way," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(4), pages 1903-1934, December.
    9. C. Chu, 1997. "Age-distribution dynamics and aging indexes," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(4), pages 551-563, November.
    10. Nick Parr & Ross Guest, 2014. "A method for socially evaluating the effects of long-run demographic paths on living standards," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(11), pages 275-318, July.
    11. Piero Manfredi & Luciano Fanti, 2004. "Age distribution and age heterogeneities in economic profiles as sources of conflict between efficiency and equity in the Solow-Stiglitz framework," Discussion Papers 2004/37, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    12. d’Albis, Hippolyte & Bonnet, Carole & Navaux, Julien & Pelletan, Jacques & Wolff, François-Charles, 2015. "Le déficit de cycle de vie en France: une évaluation pour la période 1979-2011," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1513, CEPREMAP.
    13. d'Albis, Hippolyte & Augeraud-Véron, Emmanuelle & Schubert, Katheline, 2010. "Demographic-economic equilibria when the age at motherhood is endogenous," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 1211-1221, November.
    14. repec:kap:iaecre:v:20:y:2014:i:2:p:167-187 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Sanchez-Romero, Miguel & Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, Alexia, 2017. "Redistributive effects of the US pension system among individuals with different life expectancy," ECON WPS - Vienna University of Technology Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 03/2017, Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, Research Group Economics (ECON).

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