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Longevity, Retirement, And Capital Accumulation In A Recursive Model With An Application To Mandatory Retirement

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  • Zhang, Jie
  • Zhang, Junsen

Abstract

This paper explores how retirement timing, together with life-cycle saving and human capital investment in children, responds to rising longevity in a recursive model with altruistic agents. We find that rising longevity raises the retirement age. If initial life expectancy is not too high, rising longevity also raises human capital investment in children and the saving rate. Through these channels, rising longevity can be conducive to long-run economic growth. A binding mandatory retirement age reduces human capital investment and the growth rate, raises the saving rate, and reduces welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, Jie & Zhang, Junsen, 2009. "Longevity, Retirement, And Capital Accumulation In A Recursive Model With An Application To Mandatory Retirement," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 327-348, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:13:y:2009:i:03:p:327-348_08
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    Cited by:

    1. Sánchez-Romero, Miguel & d׳Albis, Hippolyte & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2016. "Education, lifetime labor supply, and longevity improvements," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 118-141.
    2. Akira Momota, 2020. "Long Life-span and Optimal Recurrent Education," KIER Working Papers 1042, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Junying Zhao & William Scarth & Jeremiah Hurley, 2018. "Investing in Health: A Macroeconomic Exploration of Short-Run and Long-Run Trade-Offs," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 46(1), pages 121-133, March.
    4. Lars Kunze, 2014. "Mandatory retirement and economic growth: An inverted U-shaped relationship," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 885-891.
    5. Peter J. Stauvermann & Jin Hu, 2018. "What can China Expect from an Increase of the Mandatory Retirement Age?," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 19(1), pages 229-246, May.
    6. Lau, Sau-Him Paul, 2014. "Fertility and mortality changes in an overlapping-generations model with realistic demography," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 512-521.
    7. Miyazaki, Koichi, 2014. "The effects of the raising-the-official-pension-age policy in an overlapping generations economy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 123(3), pages 329-332.
    8. Casper Hansen & Lars Lønstrup, 2012. "Can higher life expectancy induce more schooling and earlier retirement?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 1249-1264, October.

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