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The People’s Republic of China and Global Imbalances from a View of Sectorial Reforms

  • Ito, Hiro

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Volz, Ulrich

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

This paper examines the impact of sectorial reforms on current account imbalances, with a special focus on the People’s Republic of China (PRC). In particular, we investigate to what extent reforms pertaining to the financial sector, social protection, and healthcare may contribute to a rebalancing of the PRC’s persistent current account imbalances. Our forecasting results suggest that reforming the financial sector would be a significant contributor to the country’s rebalancing with an effect much larger than that of capital account liberalization. Strengthened provisions of social protection and publicly-funded healthcare are also found to contribute to a rebalancing of the PRC economy.

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File URL: http://www.adbi.org/files/2012.11.02.wp393.prc.global.imbalances.sectorial.reforms.pdf
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Paper provided by Asian Development Bank Institute in its series ADBI Working Papers with number 393.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 05 Nov 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0393
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  1. Chinn, Menzie D. & Prasad, Eswar S., 2003. "Medium-term determinants of current accounts in industrial and developing countries: an empirical exploration," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 47-76, January.
  2. Menzie D. Chinn & Barry Eichengreen & Hiro Ito, 2011. "A Forensic Analysis of Global Imbalances," NBER Working Papers 17513, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Marcos D. Chamon & Eswar S. Prasad, 2010. "Why Are Saving Rates of Urban Households in China Rising?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 93-130, January.
  4. Chinn,M.D. & Ito,H., 2005. "What matters for financial development? : capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Working papers 4, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  5. Charles Yuji Horioka & Akiko Terada-Hagiwara, 2011. "The Determinants and Long-term Projections of Saving Rates in Developing Asia," ISER Discussion Paper 0821, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  6. Prasad, Eswar, 2009. "Rebalancing Growth in Asia," IZA Discussion Papers 4298, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Feldstein, Martin & Horioka, Charles, 1980. "Domestic Saving and International Capital Flows," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 90(358), pages 314-29, June.
  8. Enrica Detragiache & Abdul Abiad & Thierry Tressel, 2008. "A New Database of Financial Reforms," IMF Working Papers 08/266, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Emanuele Baldacci & Ding Ding & David Coady & Giovanni Callegari & Pietro Tommasino & Jaejoon Woo & Manmohan S. Kumar, 2010. "Public Expenditureson Social Programs and Household Consumption in China," IMF Working Papers 10/69, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2010. "China's Growth to 2030: The Roles of Demographic Change and Financial Reform," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 592-610, 08.
  11. Volz, Ulrich & Reade, J. James, 2011. "Chinese Monetary Policy and the Dollar Peg," Annual Conference 2011 (Frankfurt, Main): The Order of the World Economy - Lessons from the Crisis 48740, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  12. Kai Liu & Marcos Chamon & Eswar Prasad, 2010. "Income Uncertainty and Household Savings in China," IMF Working Papers 10/289, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Qingyuan Du & Shang-Jin Wei, 2010. "A Sexually Unbalanced Model of Current Account Imbalances," NBER Working Papers 16000, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Johansson, Anders C. & Wang, Xun, 2012. "Financial Repression and External Imbalances," Working Paper Series 2012-20, China Economic Research Center, Stockholm School of Economics.
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